UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549


FORM 10-K

x                               ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 30, 2006

OR

o                                  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM            TO            

Commission file number:

001-31829


CARTER’S, INC.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

 

13-3912933

(State or other jurisdiction of

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

incorporation or organization)

 

 

 

The Proscenium
1170 Peachtree Street NE, Suite 900
Atlanta, Georgia 30309

(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)

(404) 745-2700

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)


SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE ACT:

TITLE OF EACH CLASS 

NAME OF EACH EXCHANGE ON

Carter’s, Inc.’s common stock

WHICH REGISTERED:

par value $0.01 per share

New York Stock Exchange

 

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(g) OF THE ACT:

None


Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes x  No o

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes o  No x

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x  No o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Check one:

Large Accelerated Filer x      Accelerated Filer o      Non-Accelerated Filer o

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o  No x

The approximate aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the Registrant as of July 1, 2006 (the last business day of our most recently completed second quarter) was $1,474,913,146.

There were 59,040,680 shares of Carter’s, Inc.’s common stock with a par value of $0.01 per share outstanding as of the close of business on February 28, 2007.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the definitive proxy statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Regulation 14A relating to the Annual Meeting of Stockholders of Carter’s, Inc., to be held on May 11, 2007, will be incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K. Carter’s, Inc. intends to file such proxy statement with the SEC not later than 120 days after its fiscal year ended December 30, 2006.

 




CARTER’S, INC.

INDEX TO ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 30, 2006

 

 

 

Page

 

PART I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1:

 

Business

 

 

1

 

 

Item 1A:

 

Risk Factors

 

 

8

 

 

Item 1B:

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

 

11

 

 

Item 2:

 

Properties

 

 

12

 

 

Item 3:

 

Legal Proceedings

 

 

12

 

 

Item 4:

 

Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

 

 

12

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5:

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters, and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

 

13

 

 

Item 6:

 

Selected Financial Data

 

 

14

 

 

Item 7:

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      

 

 

17

 

 

Item 7A:

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

 

34

 

 

Item 8:

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

 

36

 

 

Item 9:

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure     

 

 

76

 

 

Item 9A:

 

Controls and Procedures

 

 

76

 

 

Item 9B:

 

Other Information

 

 

76

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 10:

 

Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant

 

 

77

 

 

Item 11:

 

Executive Compensation

 

 

77

 

 

Item 12:

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

 

77

 

 

Item 13:

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions

 

 

77

 

 

Item 14:

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

 

77

 

 

PART IV

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 15:

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

 

78

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

 

81

 

 

CERTIFICATIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 




PART I

Our market share data is based on information provided by the NPD Group, Inc. Unless otherwise indicated, references to market share in this Annual Report on Form 10-K mean our share expressed as a percentage of total retail sales of a market. NPD has restated historical data, therefore, the market data reported in previous years is not directly comparable to the data reported in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The baby and young children’s market includes apparel products from sizes newborn to seven.

Unless the context indicates otherwise, in this filing on Form 10-K, “Carter’s,” the “Company,” “we,” “us,” “its,” and “our” refers to Carter’s, Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries.

ITEM 1.                BUSINESS

We are the largest branded marketer of apparel exclusively for babies and young children in the United States. On July 14, 2005, through our wholly-owned subsidiary The William Carter Company (“TWCC”), we acquired OshKosh B’Gosh, Inc. for a purchase price of $312.1 million, (the “Acquisition”). Established in 1895, OshKosh is recognized and trusted by consumers for its line of high-quality apparel for children sizes newborn to 16.

We own two of the most highly recognized and most trusted brand names in the children’s apparel industry, Carter’s and OshKosh. We have extensive experience in the young children’s apparel market and focus on delivering products that satisfy our consumers’ needs. We market high-quality, essential core products at prices that deliver an attractive value proposition for consumers.

We have developed a business model that we believe has multiple platforms for growth and is focused on high volume and productivity. We believe each of our brands has its own unique positioning in the marketplace and strong growth potential. Our brands compete in the $22 billion children’s apparel market, for children sizes newborn to seven, with our Carter’s brand achieving the #1 branded position with a 7.3% market share. Our OshKosh brand also has a strong position with a 3.1% market share. We offer multiple product categories, including baby, sleepwear, playclothes, and other accessories. Our distribution strategy enables us to reach a broad range of consumers through channel, price point, and region. We sell our products to national department stores, chain and specialty stores, discount retailers, and, as of December 30, 2006, through 219 Carter’s and 157 OshKosh outlet and brand retail stores.

Since 1992, when the current executive management team joined Carter’s, we have increased net sales from $227 million to $1.3 billion in fiscal 2006. Over the past five fiscal years, we have increased net sales at a compounded annual growth rate of 21.0%, and we have increased operating income from $31.7 million in fiscal 2001 to $165.1 million in fiscal 2006, yielding a compounded annual growth rate of 39.1%. During this five-year period, our pre-tax results were decreased in fiscal 2001 by Acquisition-related charges of $11.3 million, debt extinguishment charges of $12.5 million, and closure costs of $4.0 million. In fiscal 2003, our pre-tax results were decreased by debt extinguishment charges of $9.5 million, a management fee termination charge of $2.6 million, and closure costs of $1.0 million. In fiscal 2005, our pre-tax results were decreased by debt extinguishment charges of $20.1 million, $13.9 million in charges related to a fair value step-up of inventory acquired from OshKosh, and closure costs of $8.4 million.

The Company’s principal executive offices are located at The Proscenium, 1170 Peachtree Street NE, Suite 900, Atlanta, Georgia 30309, and our telephone number is (404) 745-2700.

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OUR BRANDS, PRODUCTS, AND DISTRIBUTION CHANNELS

CARTER’S BRANDS

Under our Carter’s brand, we design, source, and market a broad array of products, primarily for sizes newborn to seven. Our Carter’s brand is sold in department stores, national chains, specialty stores, off-price sales channels, and through our Carter’s retail stores. Additionally, we sell our Just One Year and Child of Mine brands through the mass channel at Target and Wal-Mart, respectively. In fiscal 2006, we sold over 282 million units of Carter’s, Just One Year, and Child of Mine products to our wholesale customers, mass channel customers, and through our retail stores, an increase of approximately 9% from fiscal 2005. Under our Carter’s, Just One Year, and Child of Mine brands, sales growth has been driven by our focus on essential, high-volume, core apparel products for babies and young children. Such products include bodysuits, pajamas, blanket sleepers, gowns, bibs, towels, washcloths, and receiving blankets. Our top ten baby and sleepwear core products accounted for approximately 80% of our baby and sleepwear net sales in fiscal 2006, including the mass channel. We believe these core products are consumer staples and are insulated from changes in fashion trends. Whether they are shopping for their own children or purchasing gifts, consumers provide consistent demand for our products as they purchase the first garments and related accessories for the more than four million babies born each year and replace clothing their children outgrow.

We have four cross-functional product teams focused on the development of our baby, sleepwear, playclothes, and mass channel products. These teams are skilled in identifying and developing high-volume, core products. Each team includes members from merchandising, design, sourcing, product development, forecasting, and supply chain logistics. These teams follow a disciplined approach to fabric usage, color rationalization, and productivity and are supported by a dedicated art department and state-of-the-art design systems. We also license our brand names to other companies to create a complete collection of lifestyle products, including bedding, hosiery, underwear, shoes, room décor, and toys. The licensing team directs the use of our designs, art, and selling strategies to all licensees.

We believe this disciplined approach to product design reduces fashion risk and large seasonal fluctuations and supports efficient operations. We conduct product testing in our own stores, and we analyze quantitative measurements such as pre-season bookings, weekly over-the-counter selling results, and daily re-order rates in order to assess productivity.

CARTER’S BRAND POSITIONING

Our strategy has been to drive our brand image as the leader in baby and young children’s apparel and to consistently provide quality products at a great value to consumers. We employ a disciplined marketing strategy which identifies and focuses on core products. We believe that we have strengthened our brand image with the consumer by differentiating our core products through fabric improvements, new artistic applications, and new packaging and presentation strategies. We also attempt to differentiate our products through store-in-store shops and advertising with wholesale and mass channel customers. We have invested in display units for our major wholesale customers that clearly present our core products on their floors to enhance brand and product presentation. We also strive to provide our wholesale and mass channel customers with consistent, premium service, including delivering and replenishing products on time to fulfill customer and consumer needs.

CARTER’S PRODUCTS

Baby

Carter’s brand baby products include bodysuits, undershirts, towels, washcloths, receiving blankets, layette gowns, bibs, caps, and booties. In fiscal 2006, we generated $300.7 million in net sales of these products, excluding the mass channel, representing 22.4% of our consolidated net sales.

Our Carter’s brand is the leading brand in the baby category. In fiscal 2006, in the department store, national chain, outlet, specialty store, and off-price sales channels, our aggregate market share under the

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Carter’s brand was approximately 24.6% for baby, which represents greater than four times the market share of the next largest brand. We sell a complete range of baby products for newborns, primarily made of cotton. We attribute our leading market position to our brand strength, distinctive print designs, artistic applications, reputation for quality, and ability to manage our dedicated floor space for our retail customers. We tier our products through marketing programs targeted toward gift-givers, experienced mothers, and first-time mothers. Our Carter’s Classics product line consists of coordinated baby programs designed for first-time mothers and gift-givers. Our Carter’s Starters product line, the largest component of our baby business, provides mothers with essential core products and accessories, including value-focused multi-packs.

Sleepwear

Carter’s brand sleepwear products include pajamas, cotton long underwear, and blanket sleepers in sizes 12 months to size seven. In fiscal 2006, we generated $154.7 million in net sales of these products, excluding the mass channel, or 11.5% of our consolidated net sales.

Our Carter’s brand is the leading brand of sleepwear for babies and young children within the department store, national chain, outlet, specialty store, and off-price sales channels in the United States. In fiscal 2006, in these channels, our Carter’s brand market share was approximately 25%. As in baby, we differentiate our sleepwear products by offering high-volume, core products with creative artwork and soft fabrications.

Playclothes

Carter’s brand playclothes products include knit and woven cotton apparel for everyday use in sizes three months to size seven. In fiscal 2006, we generated $290.0 million in net sales of these products, excluding the mass channel, or 21.6% of our consolidated net sales.

We have focused on building our Carter’s brand in the playclothes market by developing a base of essential, high-volume, core products that utilize original print designs and innovative artistic applications. We believe this product focus, in combination with our brand strength, strong customer relationships, and expanded global sourcing network, is increasing our playclothes sales. Our 2006 Carter’s brand playclothes market share was 7% in the $9.4 billion department store, national chain, outlet, specialty store, and off-price sales channels.

Mass Channel Products

Our mass channel product team focuses on baby, sleepwear, and playclothes and develops differentiated products specifically for the mass channel, including different fabrications, artwork, and packaging. Our 2006 market share was 5.6% in the $8.6 billion mass channel children’s apparel market. Our Child of Mine product line, which is sold in substantially all Wal-Mart stores nationwide, includes layette, sleepwear, and playclothes along with a range of licensed products, such as hosiery, bedding, toys, and gifts. During 2005, we successfully expanded our product offering in the mass channel under our Child of Mine brand to include playclothes products. We also sell our Just One Year brand to Target, which includes baby, sleepwear, and baby playclothes along with a range of licensed products, such as hosiery, bedding, toys, and gifts. In fiscal 2006, we generated $220.3 million in net sales of our Child of Mine and Just One Year products, or 16.4%, of our consolidated net sales.

Other Products

Our other product offerings include bedding, outerwear, shoes, socks, diaper bags, gift sets, toys, room décor, and hair accessories. In fiscal 2006, we generated $52.3 million in net sales of these other products in our Carter’s retail stores.

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Licensed Products

We currently extend our Carter’s, Child of Mine, and Just One Year product offerings by licensing our brands to 16 domestic marketers in the United States. These licensing partners develop and sell products through our multiple sales channels while leveraging our brand strength, customer relationships, and designs. Licensed products provide our customers and consumers with a range of products that complement and expand upon our core baby and young children’s apparel offerings. Our license agreements require strict adherence to our quality and compliance standards and to a multi-step product approval process. We work in conjunction with our licensing partners in the development of their products and ensure that they fit within our vision of high-quality, core products at attractive values to the consumer. In addition, we work closely with our wholesale and mass channel customers and our licensees to gain dedicated real estate for licensed product categories. In fiscal 2006, our Carter’s brand and mass channel licensees generated wholesale and mass channel net sales of $166.8 million on which we earned $15.1 million in royalty income.

CARTER’S DISTRIBUTION CHANNELS

As described above, we sell our Carter’s brand products to leading retailers throughout the United States in the wholesale and mass channels and through our own Carter’s retail outlet and brand stores. In fiscal 2006, sales of our Carter’s brand products through the wholesale channel accounted for 34.6% of our consolidated net sales, sales through our retail stores accounted for 24.8% of our consolidated net sales, and sales through the mass channel accounted for 16.4% of our consolidated net sales.

Business segment financial information for our Carter’s brand wholesale, Carter’s brand retail, and Carter’s brand mass channel segments is contained in ITEM 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data,” Note 15—“Segment Information” to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements.

Our Carter’s brand wholesale customers include top retailers, such as Kohl’s, Babies “R” Us, JCPenney, Costco, Federated, and Sears. Our mass channel customers are Wal-Mart and Target. Our sales professionals work with their department or specialty store accounts to establish annual plans for our baby products, which we refer to as core basics. Once we establish an annual plan with an account, we place the majority of our accounts on our automatic reorder plan for core basics. This allows us to plan our sourcing requirements and benefits both us and our wholesale and mass channel customers by maximizing our customers’ in-stock positions, thereby improving sales and profitability. We intend to drive continued growth with our wholesale and mass channel customers through our focus on managing our key accounts’ business through product mix, fixturing, brand presentation, and advertising. We believe that we maintain strong account relationships and drive brand growth through frequent meetings with the senior management of our major wholesale and mass channel customers.

As of December 30, 2006, we operated 219 Carter’s retail stores, of which 158 were outlet stores and 61 were brand stores. These stores carry a complete assortment of first-quality baby and young children’s apparel, accessories, and gift items. Our stores average approximately 4,800 square feet per location and are distinguished by an easy, consumer-friendly shopping environment. We believe our brand strength and our assortment of core products has made our stores a destination location within many outlet and strip centers. Our outlet stores are generally located within 20 to 30 minutes outside of densely populated areas. Our brand stores are generally located in high-traffic, strip centers located in or near major cities.

We have established a real estate selection process whereby we fully assess all new locations based on demographic factors, retail adjacencies, and population density. We believe that we are located in many of the premier outlet centers in the United States and we continue to add new strip center locations to our real estate portfolio.

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OSHKOSH BRANDS

Under our OshKosh brand, we design, source, and market a broad array of young children’s apparel, primarily for children in sizes newborn to 16. Our OshKosh brand is currently sold in our OshKosh retail stores, department stores, national chains, specialty stores, and through off-price sales channels. We also have a licensing agreement with Target through which Target sells products under our Genuine Kids from OshKosh brand. In the few years prior to acquiring OshKosh in July 2005, the OshKosh and related brands experienced a significant decline in sales, most notably in the wholesale channel. However, given its long history of durability, quality, and style, we believe our OshKosh brand continues to be a market leader in the children’s branded apparel industry and represents a significant long-term growth opportunity for us, especially in the $9.4 billion young children’s playclothes market, excluding the mass channel. Our plans to grow the OshKosh business focus on continuing to implement our core product marketing disciplines, leveraging our relationships with major wholesale accounts, leveraging our infrastructure and supply chain, and improving the productivity of our OshKosh retail stores.

OSHKOSH BRAND POSITIONING

We believe our OshKosh brand stands for high-quality, authentic, active products for children sizes newborn to 16. Our core OshKosh brand products include denim, overalls, fleece tops and bottoms, and other playclothes for children. Our OshKosh brand is positioned differently from our Carter’s brand. Our OshKosh brand is generally positioned towards an older age segment (ages 2-7) and at higher average prices than our Carter’s brand. We believe our OshKosh brand has significant brand name recognition, which consumers associate with rugged, durable, and active playclothes for young children.

OSHKOSH PRODUCTS

Playclothes

Our OshKosh brand is best known for its playclothes products. In fiscal 2006, we generated $232.5 million in net sales of OshKosh brand playclothes products, which accounted for approximately 17.3% of our consolidated net sales. OshKosh brand playclothes products include denim apparel products with multiple wash treatments and coordinating garments, overalls, woven tops and bottoms, and apparel products for everyday use in sizes newborn to 16. We plan to grow this business by continuing to reduce product complexity, leveraging our strong customer relationships and global supply chain expertise, and improving product value.

We believe our OshKosh brand represents a significant opportunity for us to increase our share in the $16.0 billion young children’s playclothes market, which includes the mass channel. The market for baby and young children’s playclothes in fiscal 2006 was more than six times the size of the baby and sleepwear markets combined. The $16.0 billion playclothes market for babies and young children is highly fragmented.

Our OshKosh brand’s playclothes market share in the department store, national chain, outlet, specialty store, and off-price sales channels in 2006 was approximately 5.4% in the $9.4 billion market in these channels. We are continuing to develop a base of high-volume, core playclothes products for our OshKosh brand.

Baby

In fiscal 2006, we generated approximately $54.6 million in OshKosh brand baby products in our OshKosh retail stores, which accounted for approximately 4.1% of our consolidated net sales.

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Other Products

The remainder of our OshKosh brand product offering includes outerwear, shoes, hosiery, and accessories. In fiscal 2006, we generated $38.4 million in sales of these other products in our OshKosh retail stores, which accounted for 2.9% of our consolidated net sales.

Licensed Products

We partner with a number of domestic and international licensees to extend the reach of our OshKosh brand. We currently have nine domestic licensees, as well as 27 international licensees selling apparel and accessories products in approximately 30 countries. Our largest licensing agreement is with Target. All Genuine Kids from OshKosh products sold by Target are sold pursuant to this licensing agreement. Our licensed products provide our customers and consumers with a range of OshKosh products including outerwear, shoes, bedding, and accessories. In fiscal 2006, our licensees generated wholesale and mass channel net sales of approximately $306.1 million on which we earned approximately $14.1 million in royalty income.

OSHKOSH DISTRIBUTION CHANNELS

In fiscal 2006, sales of our OshKosh brand products through our OshKosh retail stores accounted for 17.0% of our consolidated net sales and sales through the wholesale channel accounted for 7.2% of our consolidated net sales.

Business segment financial information for our OshKosh brand wholesale and OshKosh brand retail segments is contained in ITEM 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data,” Note 15—“Segment Information” to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements.

As of December 30, 2006, we operated 157 OshKosh retail stores, of which 150 were outlet stores and seven were brand stores. These stores carry a wide assortment of young children’s apparel, accessories, and gift items and average approximately 4,800 square feet per location.

Our OshKosh brand wholesale customers include top retailers, such as Kohl’s, Costco, JCPenney, and Babies “R” Us. We continue to work with our department and specialty store accounts to establish seasonal plans for playclothes products. The majority of our OshKosh brand playclothes products will be planned and ordered seasonally as we introduce new products.

GLOBAL SOURCING NETWORK

Sales and earnings growth in recent years have been driven by strong product performance made possible through our global sourcing network. We have significant experience in sourcing products from the Far East, with expertise that includes the ability to evaluate vendors, familiarity with foreign supply sources, and experience with sourcing logistics particular to the Far East. We have recruited people with these skills from Disney, Mast Industries, The Limited, The Gap, Nike, and other major apparel companies. We also have relationships with both leading and certain specialized sourcing agents in the Far East.

Our sourcing network consists of approximately 100 vendors located in approximately 15 countries. We believe that our sourcing arrangements are sufficient to meet our current operating requirements and provide capacity for growth.

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DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS

In the United States, there were approximately four million births reported in 2004, and demographers project an increase in births over the next 20 years. Favorable demographic trends support continued strength in the market for baby and young children’s products. Highlights of these trends include:

·       parents are having children later in life and are earning higher incomes when their children are born;

·       40% of all births are first children, which we believe leads to higher initial spending; and

·       grandparents are a large and growing market and are spending more money on their grandchildren than previous generations.

COMPETITION

The baby and young children’s apparel market is highly competitive. Competition is generally based upon product quality, brand name recognition, price, selection, service, and convenience. Both branded and private label manufacturers compete in the baby and young children’s apparel market. Our primary competitors in the wholesale and mass channels include Disney, Gerber, and private label product offerings. Our primary competitors in the retail store channel include Old Navy, The Gap, The Children’s Place, Gymboree, and Disney. Most retailers, including our customers, have significant private label product offerings that compete with us. Because of the highly-fragmented nature of the industry, we also compete with many small manufacturers and retailers. We believe that the strength of our Carter’s and OshKosh brand names combined with our breadth of product offerings and operational expertise position us well against these competitors.

ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS

We are subject to various federal, state, and local laws that govern activities or operations that may have adverse environmental effects. Noncompliance with these laws and regulations can result in significant liabilities, penalties, and costs. Generally, compliance with environmental laws has not had a material impact on our operations, but there can be no assurance that future compliance with such laws will not have a material adverse effect on our operations.

TRADEMARKS, COPYRIGHTS, AND LICENSES

We own many trademarks and tradenames, including Carter’s®, Carter’s® Classics, Celebrating Childhood™, Celebrating Imagination®, Child of Mine®, Just One Year®, OshKosh, OshKosh B’Gosh®, At Play Since 1895™, and Genuine Kids from OshKosh®, as well as copyrights, many of which are registered in the United States and in more than 133 foreign countries.

We license various Company trademarks, including Carter’s, Carter’s Classics, Just One Year, Child of Mine, OshKosh, OshKosh B’Gosh, OshKosh Est. 1895, and Genuine Kids from OshKosh to third parties to produce and distribute children’s apparel and related products such as diaper bags, room décor, hosiery, outerwear, underwear, bedding, plush toys, and shoes.

AVAILABLE INFORMATION

Our Internet address is www.carters.com. We are not including the information contained on our website as part of, or incorporating it by reference into, this Annual Report on Form 10-K. There we make available, free of charge, our Annual Report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to those reports, proxy statements, director and officer reports on Forms 3, 4, and 5, and amendments to these reports, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).

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Our SEC reports can be accessed through the investor relations section of our website. The information found on our website is not part of this or any other report we file with or furnish to the SEC. We also make available on our website, the Carter’s Code of Business Ethics and Professional Conduct, our Corporate Governance Principles, and the charters for the Compensation, Audit, and Nominating and Corporate Governance Committees of the Board of Directors.

EMPLOYEES

As of December 30, 2006, we had 6,731 employees, 2,959 of whom were employed on a full-time basis in our domestic operations and 3,772 of whom were employed on a part-time basis in our domestic operations. We have had no labor-related work stoppages and believe that our labor relations are good. Our only unionized employees are our production employees in our White House, Tennessee distribution center. (See Note 18 to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements regarding the closure of this facility.)

ITEM 1A.        RISK FACTORS

You should carefully consider each of the following risk factors as well as the other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission in evaluating our business. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently consider immaterial may also impair our business operations. If any of the following risks actually occur, our operating results may be affected.

Risks Relating to Our Business

The loss of one or more of our major customers could result in a material loss of revenues.

In fiscal 2006, we derived approximately 44.6% of our consolidated net sales from our top eight customers, including mass channel customers. Kohl’s and Wal-Mart accounted for approximately 11% and 10%, respectively, of our consolidated net sales. We expect that these customers will continue to represent a significant portion of our sales in the future. However, we do not enter into long-term sales contracts with our major customers, relying instead on long-standing relationships with these customers and on our position in the marketplace. As a result, we face the risk that one or more of our major customers may significantly decrease its or their business with us or terminate its or their relationships with us. Any such decrease or termination of our major customers’ business could result in a material decrease in our sales and operating income.

The acceptance of our products in the marketplace is affected by consumers’ tastes and preferences, along with fashion trends.

We believe that continued success depends on our ability to provide a unique and compelling value proposition for our consumers in the Company’s distribution channels. There can be no assurance that the demand for our products will not decline, or that we will be able to successfully evaluate and adapt our product to be aware of consumers’ tastes and preferences and fashion trends. If consumers’ tastes and preferences are not aligned with our product offerings, promotional pricing may be required to move seasonal merchandise. Increased use of promotional pricing would have a material adverse affect on our sales, gross margin, and results of operations.

The value of our brand, and our sales, could be diminished if we are associated with negative publicity.

Although our employees, agents, and third-party compliance auditors periodically visit and monitor the operations of our vendors, independent manufacturers, and licensees, we do not control these vendors, independent manufacturers, licensees, or their labor practices. A violation of our vendor policies, licensee agreements, labor laws, or other laws by these vendors, independent manufacturers, or licensees could interrupt or otherwise disrupt our supply chain or damage our brand image. As a result, negative publicity regarding our Company, brands, or products, including licensed products, could adversely affect our reputation and sales.

8




The Company’s royalty income is greatly impacted by the Company’s brand reputation.

The Company’s brand image, which is associated with providing a consumer product with outstanding quality and name recognition, makes it valuable as a royalty source. The Company is able to license complementary products and obtain royalty income from use of its Carter’s, Child of Mine, Just One Year, OshKosh, Genuine Kids from OshKosh, and related trademarks. The Company also generates foreign royalty income as our OshKosh B’Gosh label carries an international reputation for quality and American style. While the Company takes significant steps to ensure the reputation of its brand is maintained through its license agreements, there can be no guarantee that the Company’s brand image will not be negatively impacted through its association with products outside of the Company’s core apparel products.

There are deflationary pressures on the selling price of apparel products.

In part due to the actions of discount retailers, and in part due to the worldwide supply of low cost garment sourcing, the average selling price of children’s apparel continues to decrease. To the extent these deflationary pressures are offset by reductions in manufacturing costs, there is a modest affect on the gross margin percentage. However, the inability to leverage certain fixed costs of the Company’s design, sourcing, distribution, and support costs over its gross sales base could have an adverse impact on the Company’s operating income.

Our business is sensitive to overall levels of consumer spending, particularly in the apparel segment.

The Company believes that spending on children’s apparel is somewhat discretionary. While certain apparel purchases are less discretionary due to size changes as children grow, the amount of clothing consumers desire to purchase, specifically brand name apparel products, is impacted by the overall level of consumer spending. Overall economic conditions that affect discretionary consumer spending include employment levels, business conditions, tax rates, interest rates, and levels of consumer indebtedness. Reductions in the level of discretionary spending or shifts in consumer spending to other products may have a material adverse affect on the Company’s sales and results of operations.

We source substantially all of our products through foreign production arrangements. Our dependence on foreign supply sources could result in disruptions to our operations in the event of political instability, international events, or new foreign regulations and such disruptions may increase our cost of goods sold and decrease gross profit.

We source substantially all of our products through a network of vendors in the Far East, coordinated by our Far East agents. The following could disrupt our foreign supply chain, increase our cost of goods sold, decrease our gross profit, or impact our ability to get products to our customers:

·       political instability or other international events resulting in the disruption of trade in foreign countries from which we source our products;

·       the imposition of new regulations relating to imports, duties, taxes, and other charges on imports;

·       the occurrence of a natural disaster or an epidemic, the spread of which may impact our ability to obtain products on a timely basis;

·       changes in U.S. Customs procedures concerning the importation of apparel products;

·       unforeseen delays in customs clearance of any goods;

·       disruption in the global transportation network such as a port strike, world trade restrictions or war; and

·       exchange rate fluctuations between the United States dollar and the local currencies of foreign contractors.

9




These and other events beyond our control could interrupt our supply chain and delay receipt of our products into the United States.

We operate in a highly-competitive market and the size and resources of some of our competitors may allow them to compete more effectively than we can, resulting in a loss of market share and, as a result, a decrease in revenues and gross profit.

The baby and young children’s apparel market is highly competitive. Both branded and private label manufacturers compete in the baby and young children’s apparel market. Our primary competitors in our wholesale and mass channel businesses include Disney, Gerber, and private label product offerings. Our primary competitors in the retail store channel include Old Navy, The Gap, The Children’s Place, Gymboree, and Disney. Because of the fragmented nature of the industry, we also compete with many other manufacturers and retailers. Some of our competitors have greater financial resources and larger customer bases than we have and are less financially leveraged than we are. As a result, these competitors may be able to:

·       adapt to changes in customer requirements more quickly;

·       take advantage of acquisition and other opportunities more readily;

·       devote greater resources to the marketing and sale of their products; and

·       adopt more aggressive pricing strategies than we can.

The Company’s retail success and future growth is dependent upon identifying locations and negotiating appropriate lease terms for retail stores.

The Company’s retail stores are located in leased retail locations across the country. Successful operation of a retail store depends, in part, on the overall ability of the retail location to attract a consumer base sufficient to make store sales volume profitable. If the Company is unable to identify new retail locations with consumer traffic sufficient to support a profitable sales level, retail growth may consequently be limited. Further, if existing outlet centers do not maintain a sufficient customer base that provides a reasonable sales volume, there could be a material adverse impact on the Company’s sales, gross margin, and results of operations.

Our substantial leverage could adversely affect our financial condition.

On December 30, 2006, we had total debt of approximately $345.0 million.

Our substantial indebtedness could have negative consequences. For example, it could:

·       increase our vulnerability to interest rate risk;

·       limit our ability to obtain additional financing to fund future working capital, capital expenditures, and other general corporate requirements, or to carry out other aspects of our business plan;

·       require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to pay principal of, and interest on, our indebtedness, thereby reducing the availability of that cash flow to fund working capital, capital expenditures, or other general corporate purposes, or to carry out other aspects of our business plan;

·       limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industry; and

·       place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that have less debt.

In addition, our Senior Credit Facility contains financial and other restrictive covenants that may limit our ability to engage in activities that may be in our long-term best interests such as selling assets, strategic

10




acquisitions, paying dividends, and borrowing additional funds. Our failure to comply with those covenants could result in an event of default which, if not cured or waived, could result in the acceleration of all of our debt which could leave us unable to meet some or all of our obligations.

Profitability could be negatively impacted if we do not adequately forecast the demand for our products and, as a result, create significant levels of excess inventory or insufficient levels of inventory.

If the Company does not adequately forecast demand for its products and purchases inventory to support an inaccurate forecast, the Company could experience increased costs due to the need to dispose of excess inventory or lower profitability due to insufficient levels of inventory.

We may not achieve sales growth plans, cost savings, and other assumptions that support the carrying value of our intangible assets.

In connection with the 2001 Acquisition of the Company by investment funds affiliated with Berkshire Partners LLC (the “2001 Acquisition”), we recorded cost in excess of fair value of net assets acquired of $136.6 million and a Carter’s brand tradename asset of $220.2 million. Additionally, in connection with the Acquisition of OshKosh, we recorded cost in excess of fair value of net assets acquired of $143.2 million and an OshKosh brand tradename asset of $102.0 million. The carrying value of these assets is subject to annual impairment reviews as of the last day of each fiscal year or more frequently if deemed necessary due to any significant events or changes in circumstances. Estimated future cash flows used in such impairment reviews could be negatively impacted if we do not achieve our sales growth plans, planned cost savings, and other assumptions that support the carrying value of these intangible assets, which could result in potential impairment of such assets.

The Company’s success is dependent upon retaining key individuals within the organization to execute the Company’s strategic plan.

The Company’s ability to attract and retain qualified executive management, marketing, merchandising, design, sourcing, operations, and support function staffing is key to the Company’s success. If the Company were unable to attract and retain qualified individuals in these areas, an adverse impact on the Company’s growth and results of operations may result.

ITEM 1B.       UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None

11




ITEM 2.                PROPERTIES

Location

 

 

 

Approximate
floor space in
square feet

 

Principal use

 

Stockbridge, Georgia (1)

 

 

505,000

 

 

Distribution/warehousing

 

Hogansville, Georgia

 

 

258,000

 

 

Distribution/warehousing

 

Barnesville, Georgia

 

 

149,000

 

 

Distribution/warehousing

 

White House, Tennessee

 

 

284,000

 

 

Distribution/warehousing

 

Griffin, Georgia

 

 

219,000

 

 

Finance/information technology/benefits administration/rework

 

Griffin, Georgia

 

 

12,500

 

 

Carter’s customer service

 

Griffin, Georgia (2)

 

 

11,000

 

 

Information technology

 

Atlanta, Georgia (3)

 

 

102,000

 

 

Executive offices/Carter’s design and merchandising

 

Oshkosh, Wisconsin

 

 

99,000

 

 

OshKosh’s operating offices

 

Shelton, Connecticut (4)

 

 

42,000

 

 

Finance and retail store administration

 

New York, New York (5)

 

 

16,000

 

 

Carter’s sales offices

 

New York, New York (6)

 

 

19,000

 

 

OshKosh’s sales offices/showroom

 

New York, New York (7)

 

 

21,000

 

 

OshKosh’s design center

 

 

All properties are owned by the Company with the exception of:

(1) lease expirationApril 2010 (13-year renewal option); (2) lease expirationDecember 2007; (3) lease expirationJune 2015 (5-year renewal option); (4) lease expirationDecember 2007
(six-month  renewal option); (5) lease expirationJanuary 2015; (6) lease expirationApril 2007; (7) lease expirationAugust 2008.

We currently operate 376 leased retail stores located primarily in outlet and strip centers across the United States, having an average size of approximately 4,800 square feet. Generally, leases have an average term of approximately five years with additional five-year renewal options.

Aggregate lease commitments as of December 30, 2006 for the above leased properties are as follows: fiscal 2007—$36.4 million; fiscal 2008—$30.4 million; fiscal 2009—$26.0 million; fiscal 2010—$20.2 million; fiscal 2011—$14.4 million, and $32.8 million for the balance of these commitments beyond fiscal 2011.

ITEM 3.                LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

Not applicable

ITEM 4.                SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS

Not applicable

12




PART II

ITEM 5.                MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS, AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Carter’s, Inc.’s common stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol CRI. The last reported sale price per share of Carter’s, Inc.’s common stock on February 20, 2007 was $22.98. On that date there were approximately 35,060 holders of record of Carter’s, Inc.’s common stock.

On June 6, 2006, the Company effected a two-for-one stock split (the “stock split”) through a stock dividend to stockholders of record as of May 23, 2006 of one share of our common stock for each share of common stock outstanding.

The following table sets forth for the periods indicated the high and low sales prices per share of common stock as reported by the New York Stock Exchange (all periods prior to June 6, 2006 have been adjusted for the stock split):

 

 

High

 

Low

 

2006

 

 

 

 

 

First quarter

 

$

35.24

 

$

29.27

 

Second quarter

 

$

34.93

 

$

24.10

 

Third quarter

 

$

27.76

 

$

21.08

 

Fourth quarter

 

$

30.18

 

$

25.36

 

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

2005

 

 

 

 

 

First quarter

 

$

20.60

 

$

16.23

 

Second quarter

 

$

30.25

 

$

18.65

 

Third quarter

 

$

32.83

 

$

26.42

 

Fourth quarter

 

$

32.50

 

$

25.69

 

 

No purchases of Carter’s, Inc.’s common stock were made by or on behalf of the Company or any affiliated purchaser during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2006.

DIVIDENDS

Provisions in our Senior Credit Facility currently restrict the ability of our operating subsidiary, TWCC, from paying cash dividends to our parent company, Carter’s, Inc., in excess of $15.0 million, which materially restricts Carter’s, Inc. from paying cash dividends on our common stock. We do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future but intend to retain future earnings, if any, for reinvestment in the future operation and expansion of our business and related development activities. Any future decision to pay cash dividends will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend upon our financial condition, results of operations, terms of financing arrangements, capital requirements, and any other factors as our Board of Directors deems relevant.

RECENT SALES OF UNREGISTERED SECURITIES

Not applicable

13




ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following table sets forth selected financial and other data as of and for the five fiscal years ended December 30, 2006 (fiscal 2006). Financing for the 2001 Acquisition and related transactions totaled $468.2 million and was provided by: the Company’s senior credit facility (“former senior credit facility”) including $24.0 million in revolving loan facility borrowings and $125.0 million in term loan borrowings; $173.7 million from the sale by TWCC of 10.875% Senior Subordinated Notes (the “Notes”); and $145.5 million of capital invested by investment funds affiliated with Berkshire Partners LLC and other investors, which included rollover equity by our management of $18.3 million.

On October 29, 2003, we completed an initial public offering of Carter’s, Inc.’s common stock including the sale of 10,781,250 shares by us and 3,593,750 shares by the selling stockholders (adjusted for the June 6, 2006 stock split). Net proceeds to us from the offering totaled $93.9 million. On November 28, 2003, we used approximately $68.7 million of the proceeds to redeem approximately $61.3 million in outstanding Notes and pay a redemption premium of approximately $6.7 million and related accrued interest charges of $0.7 million. We used approximately $2.6 million of the net proceeds to terminate a management agreement with Berkshire Partners LLC and used approximately $11.3 million to prepay amounts outstanding under the term loan as required by the former senior credit facility. The remaining proceeds were used for working capital and other general corporate purposes.

On July 14, 2005, Carter’s, Inc., through TWCC, acquired all of the outstanding common stock of OshKosh for a purchase price of $312.1 million, which included payment for vested stock options. As part of financing the Acquisition, the Company refinanced its existing debt (the “Refinancing”), comprised of its former senior credit facility and its Notes due 2011 (together with the Acquisition, the “Transaction”).

Financing for the Transaction was provided by a new $500 million Term Loan (the “Term Loan”) and a $125 million revolving credit facility (including a sub-limit for letters of credit of $80 million, the “Revolver”) entered into by TWCC with Bank of America, N.A., as administrative agent, Credit Suisse, and certain other financial institutions (the “Senior Credit Facility”).

The proceeds from the Refinancing were used to purchase the outstanding common stock and vested stock options of OshKosh ($312.1 million), pay Transaction expenses ($6.2 million), refinance the Company’s former senior credit facility ($36.2 million), repurchase the Company’s Notes ($113.8 million), pay a redemption premium on the Company’s Notes ($14.0 million), along with accrued and unpaid interest ($5.1 million), and pay debt issuance costs ($10.6 million). Other Transaction expenses paid prior and subsequent to the closing of the Transaction totaled $1.4 million, including $0.2 million in debt issuance costs.

As a result of the Refinancing, we expensed $4.5 million in unamortized debt issuance costs related to the former senior credit facility and Notes and expensed $0.5 million related to the debt discount on the Notes. Additionally, we expensed approximately $1.1 million of debt issuance costs associated with the Senior Credit Facility in accordance with Emerging Issues Task Force (“EITF”) No. 96-19, “Debtor’s Accounting for a Modification or Exchange of Debt Instruments” (“EITF 96-19”).

On June 6, 2006, the Company effected a two-for-one stock split through a stock dividend to stockholders of record as of May 23, 2006 of one share of our common stock for each share of common stock outstanding. Earnings per share for all prior periods presented have been adjusted to reflect the stock split.

The selected financial data for the five fiscal years ended December 30, 2006 were derived from our audited consolidated financial statements. Our fiscal year ends on the Saturday in December or January nearest to the last day of December. Consistent with this policy, fiscal 2006 ended on December 30, 2006, fiscal 2005 ended on December 31, 2005, fiscal 2004 ended on January 1, 2005, fiscal 2003 ended on

14




January 3, 2004, and fiscal 2002 ended on December 28, 2002. Fiscal 2006, fiscal 2005, fiscal 2004, and fiscal 2002 each contained 52 weeks of financial results. Fiscal 2003 contained 53 weeks of financial results.

The following table should be read in conjunction with ITEM 7 “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and ITEM 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”

 

 

Fiscal Years

 

(dollars in thousands, except per share data)

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

2002

 

OPERATING DATA:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wholesale sales

 

$

560,987

 

$

486,750

 

$

385,810

 

$

356,888

 

$

301,993

 

Retail sales

 

562,153

 

456,581

 

291,362

 

263,206

 

253,751

 

Mass channel sales

 

220,327

 

178,027

 

145,949

 

83,732

 

23,803

 

Total net sales

 

1,343,467

 

1,121,358

 

823,121

 

703,826

 

579,547

 

Cost of goods sold

 

854,970

 

725,086

 

525,082

 

448,540

 

352,151

 

Gross profit

 

488,497

 

396,272

 

298,039

 

255,286

 

227,396

 

Selling, general, and administrative expenses

 

352,459

 

288,624

 

208,756

 

188,028

 

174,110

 

Closure costs (a)

 

91

 

6,828

 

620

 

1,041

 

150

 

Deferred charge write-off (b)

 

 

 

 

 

923

 

Management fee termination (c)

 

 

 

 

2,602

 

 

Royalty income

 

(29,164

)

(20,426

)

(12,362

)

(11,025

)

(8,352

)

Operating income

 

165,111

 

121,246

 

101,025

 

74,640

 

60,565

 

Interest income

 

(1,914

)

(1,322

)

(335

)

(387

)

(347

)

Loss on extinguishment of debt (d)

 

 

20,137

 

 

9,455

 

 

Interest expense

 

28,837

 

24,564

 

18,852

 

26,646

 

28,648

 

Income before income taxes

 

138,188

 

77,867

 

82,508

 

38,926

 

32,264

 

Provision for income taxes

 

50,968

 

30,665

 

32,850

 

15,648

 

13,011

 

Net income

 

$

87,220

 

$

47,202

 

$

49,658

 

$

23,278

 

$

19,253

 

PER COMMON SHARE DATA:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic net income

 

$

1.50

 

$

0.82

 

$

0.88

 

$

0.49

 

$

0.43

 

Diluted net income

 

$

1.42

 

$

0.78

 

$

0.83

 

$

0.46

 

$

0.41

 

Dividends

 

 

 

 

$

0.55

 

 

Basic weighted-average shares

 

57,996,241

 

57,280,504

 

56,251,168

 

47,222,744

 

44,906,176

 

Diluted weighted-average shares

 

61,247,122

 

60,753,384

 

59,855,914

 

50,374,984

 

47,089,800

 

BALANCE SHEET DATA (end of
period):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working capital (e)

 

$

265,904

 

$

242,442

 

$

185,968

 

$

150,632

 

$

131,085

 

Total assets

 

1,123,191

 

1,116,727

 

672,965

 

646,102

 

643,349

 

Total debt, including current maturities

 

345,032

 

430,032

 

184,502

 

212,713

 

297,622

 

Stockholders’ equity

 

495,491

 

386,644

 

327,933

 

272,536

 

179,359

 

CASH FLOW DATA:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

$

88,224

 

$

137,267

 

$

42,676

 

$

40,506

 

$

27,304

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

(30,500

)

(308,403

)

(18,577

)

(16,472

)

(15,554

)

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

 

(73,455

)

222,147

 

(26,895

)

(23,535

)

(880

)

OTHER DATA:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross margin

 

36.4

%

35.3

%

36.2

%

36.3

%

39.2

%

Depreciation and amortization

 

$

26,489

 

$

21,912

 

$

19,536

 

$

22,216

 

$

18,693

 

Capital expenditures

 

30,848

 

22,588

 

20,481

 

17,347

 

18,009

 

 

See Notes to Selected Financial Data.

15




NOTES TO SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

(a) The $1.0 million of closure costs in fiscal 2003 relate to the closure of our two sewing facilities located in Costa Rica. The $0.6 million of closure costs in fiscal 2004 relate to costs associated with the closure of our Costa Rican facilities and our distribution facility in Leola, Pennsylvania. The $6.8 million and $0.1 million of closure costs in fiscal 2005 and fiscal 2006 relate to the closure of our Mexican sewing facilities.

(b) The deferred charge write-off in fiscal 2002 reflects the write-off of $0.9 million of previously deferred costs associated with the filing of a registration statement on Form S-1 in August 2002, to register an initial public offering of Carter’s, Inc.’s common stock.

(c)   The $2.6 million reflects the payment to terminate the Berkshire Partners LLC management agreement upon completion of our initial public offering of Carter’s, Inc.’s common stock on October 29, 2003.

(d) Debt extinguishment charges in fiscal 2003 reflect the write-off of $2.4 million of debt issuance costs resulting from the redemption of $61.3 million of our Notes and the prepayment of $11.3 million on our former senior credit facility, a debt redemption premium of approximately $6.7 million, and a $0.4 million write-off of the related Note discount. Debt extinguishment charges in fiscal 2005 reflect the payment of a $14.0 million redemption premium on our Notes, the write-off of $4.5 million in unamortized debt issuance costs related to the former senior credit facility and Notes, and $0.5 million of the related Note discount. Additionally, we expensed approximately $1.1 million of debt issuance costs associated with our Senior Credit Facility in accordance with EITF 96-19.

(e) Represents total current assets less total current liabilities.

16




ITEM 7.                MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following is a discussion of our results of operations and current financial condition. You should read this discussion in conjunction with our consolidated historical financial statements and notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Our discussion of our results of operations and financial condition includes various forward-looking statements about our markets, the demand for our products and services, and our future results. We based these statements on assumptions that we consider reasonable. Actual results may differ materially from those suggested by our forward-looking statements for various reasons including those discussed in the “Risk Factors” in ITEM 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Those risk factors expressly qualify all subsequent oral and written forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf. Except for any ongoing obligations to disclose material information as required by the federal securities laws, we do not have any intention or obligation to update forward-looking statements after we file this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

OVERVIEW

Over the past 142 years, Carter’s has become one of the most highly-recognized and most trusted brand names in the children’s apparel industry. On July 14, 2005, we acquired OshKosh for a purchase price of $312.1 million, which included payment for vested stock options. Results of operations for fiscal 2006 include the operations of OshKosh for the entire period. Results of operations for fiscal 2005 include the operations of OshKosh for the period from July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005.

We sell our products under our Carter’s and OshKosh brands in the wholesale channel, which includes approximately 380 department store, national chain, and specialty store accounts. Additionally, as of December 30, 2006, we operated 219 Carter’s and 157 OshKosh retail stores located primarily in outlet and strip centers throughout the United States and sold our products in the mass channel under our Child of Mine brand to approximately 3,474 Wal-Mart stores nationwide and under our Just One Year brand to approximately 1,487 Target stores. We also extend our brand reach by licensing our Carter’s, Child of Mine, Just One Year, OshKosh, and related brand names through domestic licensing arrangements, including licensing of our Genuine Kids from OshKosh brand to Target stores nationwide. Our OshKosh B’Gosh brand name is also licensed through international licensing arrangements. During fiscal 2006, we earned approximately $29.2 million in royalty income from these arrangements, including $14.1 million from our OshKosh B’Gosh and Genuine Kids from OshKosh brands.

We have made significant progress integrating the OshKosh business. Our plans are to grow our OshKosh brand by focusing on our core product development and marketing disciplines, leveraging our relationships with major wholesale accounts, leveraging our infrastructure and supply chain, and improving the productivity of our OshKosh retail stores.

Since the Acquisition, we have reduced the number of OshKosh sub-brands and have simplified the number of product offerings under our OshKosh brand. This has allowed us to reduce product complexity, focus our efforts on essential, core products, and streamline operations. Since the Acquisition, we have closed 15 unprofitable OshKosh lifestyle stores in fiscal 2005, 14 OshKosh retail stores in fiscal 2005, and closed two additional OshKosh retail stores in fiscal 2006.

We are also leveraging our existing infrastructure and supply chain expertise to reduce costs. In December 2005, we closed the OshKosh Choloma, Honduras sewing facility and in the first quarter of fiscal 2006 we closed the OshKosh Uman, Mexico sewing facility. We have placed such production primarily with our vendors in the Far East. We have also integrated retail store operations and various other support functions throughout the Company.

17




As part of financing the Acquisition, we refinanced our existing debt, including our former senior credit facility and our outstanding 10.875% Senior Subordinated Notes due 2011 (the “Notes”). In connection with the Refinancing, we paid a $14.0 million redemption premium on the Notes, expensed $4.5 million in unamortized debt issuance costs related to the former senior credit facility and repayment of the Notes, and expensed $0.5 million related to the debt discount on the Notes. Additionally, we expensed approximately $1.1 million of debt issuance costs associated with our Senior Credit Facility in accordance with EITF 96-19.

As a result of the Transaction, we have had a significant increase in interest costs. Prior to the Transaction, for the period from January 2, 2005 through July 14, 2005, we had average borrowings of $169.1 million at an effective interest rate of 9.9% as compared to average borrowings of $472.7 million at an effective interest rate of 5.9% subsequent to the Transaction from July 15, 2005 through December 31, 2005. In fiscal 2006, we had average borrowings of $397.9 million at an effective interest rate of 7.25%. Additionally, we have acquired certain definite-lived intangible assets in connection with the Acquisition of OshKosh comprised of licensing agreements and leasehold interests which resulted in annual amortization expense of $4.7 million in fiscal 2006. Amortization expense related to these intangible assets will be $4.4 million in fiscal 2007, $4.1 million in fiscal 2008, $3.7 million in fiscal 2009, and $1.8 million in fiscal 2010.

In connection with the Acquisition of OshKosh, we recorded cost in excess of fair value of net assets acquired of $143.2 million and an OshKosh brand tradename asset of $102.0 million. The carrying value of these assets is subject to annual impairment reviews as of the last day of each fiscal year or more frequently if deemed necessary due to any significant events or changes in circumstances. Estimated future cash flows used in such impairment reviews could be negatively impacted if we do not achieve our sales growth plans, planned cost savings, and other assumptions that support the carrying value of these intangible assets, which could result in potential impairment of such assets.

Effective January 1, 2006, we adopted the provisions of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) No. 123 (revised 2004), “Share-Based Payment” (“SFAS 123R”), which resulted in a reduction in fiscal 2006 net income of approximately $2.4 million, or approximately $0.04 per diluted share. The impact of adopting SFAS 123R is discussed in Note 7 to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements. For the fiscal year ending December 29, 2007, SFAS 123R is expected to result in a reduction in net income of approximately $2.8 million, or $0.05 per basic earnings per share and $0.04 per diluted earnings per share.

Our fiscal year ends on the Saturday, in December or January, nearest the last day of December. Consistent with this policy, fiscal 2006 ended on December 30, 2006, fiscal 2005 ended on December 31, 2005, and fiscal 2004 ended on January 1, 2005. Each of these periods contained 52 weeks of financial results.

18




RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated (i) selected statement of operations data expressed as a percentage of net sales and (ii) the number of retail stores open at the end of each period:

 

 

Fiscal Years

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

Wholesale sales:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carter’s

 

34.6

%

38.1

%

46.9

%

OshKosh

 

7.2

 

5.3

 

 

Total wholesale sales

 

41.8

 

43.4

 

46.9

 

Retail store sales:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carter’s

 

24.8

 

28.2

 

35.4

 

OshKosh

 

17.0

 

12.5

 

 

Total retail store sales

 

41.8

 

40.7

 

35.4

 

Mass channel sales

 

16.4

 

15.9

 

17.7

 

Consolidated net sales

 

100.0

 

100.0

 

100.0

 

Cost of goods sold

 

63.6

 

64.7

 

63.8

 

Gross profit

 

36.4

 

35.3

 

36.2

 

Selling, general, and administrative expenses

 

26.2

 

25.7

 

25.3

 

Closure costs

 

 

0.6

 

0.1

 

Royalty income

 

(2.1

)

(1.8

)

(1.5

)

Operating income

 

12.3

 

10.8

 

12.3

 

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

1.8

 

 

Interest expense, net

 

2.0

 

2.1

 

2.3

 

Income before income taxes

 

10.3

 

6.9

 

10.0

 

Provision for income taxes

 

3.8

 

2.7

 

4.0

 

Net income

 

6.5

%

4.2

%

6.0

%

Number of retail stores at end of period:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carter’s

 

219

 

193

 

180

 

OshKosh

 

157

 

142

 

 

Total

 

376

 

335

 

180

 

 

19




FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 30, 2006 COMPARED WITH FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2005

CONSOLIDATED NET SALES

Consolidated net sales for fiscal 2006 were $1.3 billion, an increase of $222.1 million, or 19.8%, compared to $1.1 billion in fiscal 2005. This increase reflects growth in all channels of distribution and includes $325.5 million in net sales from our OshKosh brand in fiscal 2006 and $199.8 million in net sales from our OshKosh brand during the period from July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005.

 

 

For the fiscal years ended

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

December 30,
2006

 

% of
Total

 

December 31,
2005

 

% of
Total

 

Net sales:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wholesale-Carter’s

 

 

$

464,636

 

 

34.6

%

 

$

427,043

 

 

38.1

%

Wholesale-OshKosh

 

 

96,351

 

 

7.2

%

 

59,707

 

 

5.3

%

Retail-Carter’s

 

 

333,050

 

 

24.8

%

 

316,477

 

 

28.2

%

Retail-OshKosh

 

 

229,103

 

 

17.0

%

 

140,104

 

 

12.5

%

Mass Channel-Carter’s

 

 

220,327

 

 

16.4

%

 

178,027

 

 

15.9

%

Total net sales

 

 

$

1,343,467

 

 

100.0

%

 

$

1,121,358

 

 

100.0

%

 

CARTER’S WHOLESALE SALES

Carter’s brand wholesale sales increased $37.6 million in fiscal 2006, or 8.8%, to $464.6 million. Excluding off-price sales, Carter’s brand wholesale sales increased $37.7 million in fiscal 2006, or 9.5%, to $432.2 million. The increase in Carter’s brand wholesale sales, excluding off-price sales, was driven by an 11% increase in units shipped, offset by a 1% decrease in average price per unit as compared to fiscal 2005.

The growth in units shipped was driven primarily by our baby product category, which accounted for approximately 54% of total Carter’s brand wholesale units shipped in fiscal 2006. The growth in baby units shipped was driven by our focus on high-volume, essential core products.

The decrease in average price per unit as compared to fiscal 2005 was due primarily to our playclothes product category which accounted for 27% of our Carter’s brand wholesale units shipped. Playclothes average prices were down 2% as compared to fiscal 2005 due to product mix. Favorable product mix in our sleepwear category, with average prices up 1% and which accounted for 19% of our Carter’s brand wholesale units shipped in fiscal 2006, partially offset the decline in average price per unit in playclothes. Average price per unit in our baby product category was flat as compared to fiscal 2005.

Off-price sales were flat in fiscal 2006 compared to fiscal 2005. Off-price units shipped increased 1% as compared to fiscal 2005 and average price per unit decreased 1%.

OSHKOSH WHOLESALE SALES

Results for fiscal 2006 include OshKosh brand wholesale sales for the entire year and are not comparable to results for fiscal 2005 which include OshKosh brand wholesale sales from the Acquisition date of July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005.

OshKosh brand wholesale sales were $96.4 in fiscal 2006, including $7.5 million in off-price sales, and $59.7 million for the period from July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005, including $10.5 million in off-price sales. Since the Acquisition, we have reduced the number of OshKosh wholesale brands from three brands to one brand (OshKosh), significantly reduced the number of styles in order to improve productivity and exited unprofitable and marginally-profitable customer relationships.

20




MASS CHANNEL SALES

Mass channel sales increased $42.3 million in fiscal 2006, or 23.8%, to $220.3 million. The increase was driven by increased sales of $23.6 million, or 21.2%, of our Child of Mine brand to Wal-Mart and increased sales of $18.7 million, or 28.1%, of our Just One Year brand to Target. The growth in sales resulted from increased productivity, additional floor space in existing stores, and new door growth.

CARTER’S RETAIL STORES

Carter’s retail stores sales increased $16.6 million in fiscal 2006, or 5.2%, to $333.1 million. Such growth was driven by incremental sales of $23.1 million generated by new store openings offset by the impact of store closures of $6.3 million and a comparable store sales decrease of $0.2 million, or (0.1%), based on 180 locations. On a comparable store basis, transactions and units per transaction were flat and average prices decreased 0.4% as compared to fiscal 2005. Average prices decreased due to increased promotional pricing on spring and fall playclothes. In fiscal 2006, the Company significantly changed the mix of and reduced the levels of inventory in its retail stores, which negatively impacted retail store performance. Average inventory levels, on a comparable store basis, were down 10.1% as compared to fiscal 2005. The Company believes it is taking the steps necessary to improve the level and mix of inventory in its retail stores.

The Company’s comparable store sales calculations include sales for all stores that were open during the comparable fiscal period, including remodeled stores and certain relocated stores. If a store relocates within the same center with no business interruption or material change in square footage, the sales for such store will continue to be included in the comparable store calculation. If a store relocates to another center or there is a material change in square footage, such store is treated as a new store. Stores that are closed are included in the comparable store sales calculation up to the date of closing.

There were a total of 219 Carter’s retail stores as of December 30, 2006. During fiscal 2006, we opened 31 stores and closed five stores. We plan to open ten stores during fiscal 2007.

OSHKOSH RETAIL STORES

Results for fiscal 2006 include OshKosh retail store sales for the entire year and are not comparable to results for fiscal 2005 which include OshKosh retail store sales from the Acquisition date of July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005.

OshKosh retail store sales contributed $229.1 million in fiscal 2006 and $140.1 million in net sales for the period from July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005. During fiscal 2006 we opened 17 stores and closed 2 stores. During the period from July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005, we closed 29 OshKosh retail stores, including 15 OshKosh lifestyle stores.

There were a total of 157 OshKosh retail stores as of December 30, 2006. We plan to open five OshKosh retail stores during fiscal 2007.

GROSS PROFIT

Our gross profit increased $92.2 million, or 23.3%, to $488.5 million in fiscal 2006. Gross profit as a percentage of net sales was 36.4% in fiscal 2006 as compared to 35.3% in fiscal 2005.

The increase in gross profit as a percentage of net sales reflects:

(i)             an amortization charge in fiscal 2005 of $13.9 million related to a fair value step-up of inventory acquired from OshKosh and sold during the period; and

(ii)         $1.6 million of accelerated depreciation recorded in fiscal 2005 in connection with the closure of two Carter’s brand sewing facilities in Mexico.

21




Partially offsetting this increase was:

(i)             growth in our lower margin mass channel business, sales from which increased 23.8% in fiscal 2006;

(ii)         a reduction in our consolidated retail store gross margin due to increased promotional activity (consolidated retail gross margin decreased from 52.0% of consolidated retail store sales in fiscal 2005 to 51.1% of consolidated retail store sales in fiscal 2006); and

(iii)     a greater mix of OshKosh brand wholesale sales which generally have lower margins relative to Carter’s brand wholesale sales.

The Company includes distribution costs in its selling, general, and administrative expenses. Accordingly, the Company’s gross margin may not be comparable to other companies that include such distribution costs in their cost of goods sold.

SELLING, GENERAL, AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Selling, general, and administrative expenses in fiscal 2006 increased $63.8 million, or 22.1%, to $352.5 million. As a percentage of net sales, selling, general, and administrative expenses in fiscal 2006 increased to 26.2% as compared to 25.7% in fiscal 2005.

The increase in selling, general, and administrative expenses as a percentage of net sales was led primarily by:

(i)             retail store sales increasing to 41.8% of our consolidated sales mix from 40.7% last year due to the Acquisition of OshKosh. Our retail stores have a higher selling, general, and administrative cost structure than other components of our business and our OshKosh retail stores generally have a higher cost structure than our Carter’s retail stores. Additionally, in fiscal 2006, we opened 29 brand stores which have a higher cost structure and lower sales volume than our outlet stores. As a result, our retail store selling, general, and administrative expenses increased to 26.7% of consolidated retail store sales compared to 23.5% last year;

(ii)         growth in our retail store administration expenses from 3.4% of retail store sales in fiscal 2005 to 4.1% in fiscal 2006 due to expansion of the retail management team;

(iii)     incremental stock-based compensation expense of $3.9 million resulting from the adoption of SFAS 123R as further discussed in Note 7 to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements; and

(iv)       incremental amortization of OshKosh intangible assets related to OshKosh licensing agreements and leasehold interests capitalized in connection with the Acquisition, ($4.7 million in fiscal 2006 as compared to $2.2 million in fiscal 2005).

Partially offsetting these increases were:

(i)             a reduction in incentive compensation of $3.0 million as compared to fiscal 2005; and

(ii)         a decline in distribution and freight costs as a percentage of sales from 5.6% in fiscal 2005 to 5.3% in fiscal 2006.

CLOSURE COSTS

In May 2005, we decided to exit two Carter’s brand sewing facilities in Mexico. We have developed alternative capabilities to source comparable products in the Far East at lower costs. As a result of these closures, we recorded total costs of $8.4 million, including $4.6 million of severance charges, $1.3 million of

22




lease termination costs, $1.6 million of accelerated depreciation (included in cost of goods sold), $0.1 million of asset impairment charges, and $0.8 million of other exit costs during fiscal 2005.

During fiscal 2006, we recorded $91,000 in closure costs which included $74,000 in severance charges and $17,000 in other exit costs related to the closures.

ROYALTY INCOME

Our royalty income increased $8.7 million, or 42.8%, to $29.2 million in fiscal 2006.

We license the use of our Carter’s, Just One Year, and Child of Mine brands. Royalty income from these brands was approximately $15.1 million in fiscal 2006, an increase of 8.9% or $1.3 million as compared to fiscal 2005 due to increased sales by our Carter’s and Child of Mine brand licensees.

We license the use of our OshKosh and Genuine Kids from OshKosh brand names. Results for fiscal 2006 include a full year of royalty income from these brands and are not comparable to results for fiscal 2005 which include licensee sales from the Acquisition date of July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Royalty income from these brands was approximately $14.1 million in fiscal 2006, including $6.8 million in international royalty income, and $6.6 million for the period from July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005, including $2.6 million in international royalty income.

OPERATING INCOME

Operating income increased $43.9 million, or 36.2%, to $165.1 million in fiscal 2006. The increase in operating income was due to the factors described above.

LOSS ON EXTINGUISHMENT OF DEBT

As a result of the Refinancing in fiscal 2005, we incurred a $14.0 million redemption premium in connection with the repurchase of our Notes, expensed $4.5 million in debt issuance costs associated with our former senior credit facility and Notes, expensed $0.5 million related to the debt discount on the Notes, and wrote off $1.1 million in debt issuance costs associated with our Senior Credit Facility in accordance with EITF  96-19.

INTEREST EXPENSE, NET

Interest expense in fiscal 2006 increased $3.7 million, or 15.8%, to $26.9 million. This increase is attributable to the impact of additional borrowings associated with the Transaction. In fiscal 2006, weighted-average borrowings were $397.9 million at an effective interest rate of 7.25% as compared to weighted-average borrowings of $320.6 million at an effective interest rate of 7.66% in fiscal 2005. In fiscal 2006, we reclassified approximately $1.3 million related to our interest rate swap agreement into earnings, which effectively reduced our interest expense under the Term Loan.

INCOME TAXES

Our effective tax rate was approximately 36.9% in fiscal 2006 as compared to approximately 39.4% in fiscal 2005. Our effective tax rate decreased in fiscal 2006 due primarily to lower state taxable income. See Note 9 to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements for a reconciliation of the statutory rate to our effective tax rate.

NET INCOME

Our fiscal 2006 net income increased $40.0 million to $87.2 million as compared to $47.2 million in fiscal 2005 as a result of the factors described above.

23




FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2005 COMPARED WITH FISCAL YEAR ENDED JANUARY 1, 2005

CONSOLIDATED NET SALES

Consolidated net sales for fiscal 2005 were $1.1 billion, an increase of $298.2 million, or 36.2% compared to $823.1 million in fiscal 2004. This increase reflects growth in all channels of distribution and includes $199.8 million in net sales from OshKosh during the period from July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005.

 

 

For the fiscal years ended

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

December 31,
2005

 

% of
Total

 

January 1,
2005

 

% of
Total

 

Net sales:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wholesale-Carter’s

 

 

$

427,043

 

 

38.1

%

$

385,810

 

46.9

%

Wholesale-OshKosh

 

 

59,707

 

 

5.3

%

 

 

Retail-Carter’s

 

 

316,477

 

 

28.2

%

291,362

 

35.4

%

Retail-OshKosh

 

 

140,104

 

 

12.5

%

 

 

Mass Channel-Carter’s

 

 

178,027

 

 

15.9

%

145,949

 

17.7

%

Total net sales

 

 

$

1,121,358

 

 

100.0

%

$

823,121

 

100.0

%

 

CARTER’S WHOLESALE SALES

Carter’s brand wholesale sales increased $41.2 million in fiscal 2005, or 10.7%, to $427.0 million. Excluding off-price sales, Carter’s brand wholesale sales increased $28.7 million in fiscal 2005, or 7.8%, to $394.5 million. The increase in Carter’s brand wholesale sales, excluding off-price sales, was driven by a 3% increase in units shipped and a 5% increase in average price per unit as compared to fiscal 2004.

Growth in units shipped was driven primarily by our playclothes product category, which accounted for approximately 30% of total Carter’s brand wholesale units shipped in fiscal 2005.

The increase in average price per unit as compared to fiscal 2004 was driven primarily by growth in our playclothes product category. In addition, favorable product mix in our sleepwear category, which accounted for 20% of our Carter’s brand wholesale units shipped in fiscal 2005, also contributed to the increase in average price per unit. Our playclothes and sleepwear product categories both carry a higher average price per unit than our baby product category.

Off-price sales increased $12.6 million in fiscal 2005, or 63.0%, to $32.5 million. Off-price units shipped were up 93% as compared to fiscal 2004 and average price per unit was down 16%. The increase in off-price units shipped reflects the disposal of a larger percentage of our excess inventory through the off-price channel rather than selling such excess in our retail stores.

OSHKOSH WHOLESALE SALES

OshKosh brand wholesale sales were $59.7 million for the period from July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005, including $10.5 million in off-price sales. As the Acquisition was completed on July 14, 2005, all sales from OshKosh brand products are incremental to our results. Since the Acquisition, we have reduced the number of OshKosh wholesale brands from three brands to one brand (OskKosh B’Gosh), significantly reduced the number of styles in order to improve productivity, and exited unprofitable and marginally-profitable customer relationships.

MASS CHANNEL SALES

Mass channel sales increased $32.1 million in fiscal 2005, or 22.0%, to $178.0 million. The increase was driven by increased sales of $23.4 million, or 26.6%, of our Child of Mine brand to Wal-Mart and

24




increased sales of $8.6 million, or 14.9%, of our Just One Year brand to Target. The increase in sales resulted primarily from selling products at more Wal-Mart and Target stores, additional floor space at both Wal-Mart and Target, and $8.5 million from new product introductions.

CARTER’S RETAIL STORES

Carter’s retail stores sales increased $25.1 million in fiscal 2005, or 8.6%, to $316.5 million. Such growth was driven by incremental sales of $12.2 million generated by new store openings and a comparable store sales increase of $13.8 million, or 4.8%, based on 174 locations. This growth was partially offset by the impact of four store closures of $0.9 million.

The increase in comparable store sales was led by a comparable store sales increase of 10.7% in our brand stores. As of December 31, 2005, we had 41 brand stores as compared to 27 stores as of January 1, 2005. Our “drive to” outlet stores, of which there were 71 as of December 31, 2005, had a comparable store sales increase of 2.8% and were impacted by rising fuel prices as these locations are generally located within 20 to 30 minutes outside of densely populated areas. Across the chain, comparable store sales have been driven by converting all stores to our new format beginning May of 2004, including moving baby products to the front of the store, more impactful window displays, and more effective in-store merchandising and marketing. All stores were converted to the new store format as of April 2005.

There were a total of 193 Carter’s retail stores as of December 31, 2005. During fiscal 2005, we opened 17 stores and closed 4 stores.

OSHKOSH RETAIL STORES

OshKosh retail store sales contributed $140.1 million in net sales from the period from July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005. During the period from July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005, we closed 29 OshKosh retail stores, including 15 OshKosh lifestyle stores. Liabilities for these store closures have been provided for in purchase accounting as described in Note 16 to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements.

There were a total of 142 OshKosh retail stores as of December 31, 2005.

GROSS PROFIT

Our gross profit increased $98.2 million, or 33.0%, to $396.3 million in fiscal 2005. Gross profit as a percentage of net sales was 35.3% in fiscal 2005 as compared to 36.2% in fiscal 2004.

The decrease in gross profit as a percentage of net sales reflects:

(i)             an amortization charge of $13.9 million related to a fair value step-up of inventory acquired from OshKosh and sold during the period;

(ii)         growth in our lower margin mass channel business;

(iii)     the impact of lower margin OshKosh brand wholesale sales relative to Carter’s brand wholesale sales; and

(iv)       $1.6 million of accelerated depreciation recorded in connection with our decision to close two sewing facilities in Mexico.

Partially offsetting these decreases were:

(i)             a reduction in product costs resulting from leveraging our full package sourcing network and completing the transition of Carter’s brand products to full package sourcing;

25




(ii)         significant growth in our higher margin retail business, resulting from the Acquisition of the OshKosh retail stores (consolidated retail sales increased from 35% of total sales to 41% of total sales); and

(iii)     a decrease of $2.5 million in charges related to excess inventory.

The Company includes distribution costs in its selling, general, and administrative expenses. Accordingly, the Company’s gross margin may not be comparable to other companies that include such distribution costs in their cost of goods sold.

SELLING, GENERAL, AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Selling, general, and administrative expenses in fiscal 2005 increased $79.9 million, or 38.3%, to $288.6 million. As a percentage of net sales, selling, general, and administrative expenses in fiscal 2005 increased to 25.7% as compared to 25.3% in fiscal 2004.

The increase in selling, general, and administrative expenses as a percentage of net sales was led primarily by:

(i)             the impact of a higher retail store cost structure at OshKosh as retail store selling, general, and administrative expenses, which comprise approximately 39% of consolidated selling, general, and administrative expenses, grew from 23.6% of retail sales in fiscal 2004 to 24.8% of retail sales in fiscal 2005; and

(ii)         amortization of OshKosh intangible assets including a charge of $2.2 million related to the OshKosh licensing agreements and leasehold interests capitalized in connection with the Acquisition.

Partially offsetting these increases were:

(i)             a decline in distribution costs as a percentage of sales from 4.9% in fiscal 2004 to 4.2% in fiscal 2005, driven primarily by efficiencies gained with our distribution center in Stockbridge, Georgia;

(ii)         effectively managing growth in spending to a rate lower than the growth in net sales, most notably in the mass channel; and

(iii)     cessation of amortization of our Carter’s licensing agreements, which were fully amortized on August 15, 2004. Amortization expense in fiscal 2004 related to these agreements was approximately $3.1 million.

CLOSURE COSTS

In May 2005, we decided to exit two Carter’s brand sewing facilities in Mexico. We have developed alternative capabilities to source comparable products in the Far East at lower costs. As a result of these closures, we have recorded total costs of $8.4 million, including $4.6 million of severance charges, $1.3 million of lease termination costs, $1.6 million of accelerated depreciation (included in cost of goods sold), $0.1 million of asset impairment charges, and $0.8 million of other exit costs during fiscal 2005.

ROYALTY INCOME

Our royalty income increased $8.1 million, or 65.2%, to $20.4 million in fiscal 2005.

We license the use of our Carter’s, Carter’s Classics, Just One Year, and Child of Mine names. Royalty income from these brands was approximately $13.8 million in fiscal 2005, an increase of 11.8% or $1.5

26




million as compared to fiscal 2004. This increase was driven primarily by increased sales of our Carter’s and Just One Year brand licensees.

As a result of the Acquisition, as discussed in Note 1 to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements, we license the use of our OshKosh and Genuine Kids from OshKosh brand names. Royalty income from these brands was approximately $6.6 million for the period from July 14, 2005 through December 31, 2005, including $2.6 million in international royalty income.

OPERATING INCOME

Operating income increased $20.2 million, or 20.0%, to $121.2 million in fiscal 2005. The increase in operating income was due to the factors described above.

LOSS ON EXTINGUISHMENT OF DEBT

As a result of the Refinancing, we incurred a $14.0 million redemption premium in connection with the repurchase of our Notes, wrote off $4.5 million in debt issuance costs associated with our former senior credit facility and Notes, expensed $0.5 million related to the debt discount on the Notes, and wrote off $1.1 million in new debt issuance costs associated with our Senior Credit Facility in accordance with EITF 96-19.

INTEREST EXPENSE, NET

Interest expense in fiscal 2005 increased $4.7 million, or 25.5%, to $23.2 million. This increase is attributable to the impact of additional borrowings associated with the Transaction as described in Note 1 to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements. Weighted-average borrowings in fiscal 2005 prior to the Transaction were $169.1 million at an effective interest rate of 9.9%. Subsequent to the Transaction, weighted-average borrowings were $472.7 million at an effective interest rate of 5.9%. In fiscal 2004, weighted-average borrowings were $204.6 million at an effective interest rate of 8.6%.

INCOME TAXES

Our effective tax rate was 39.4% in fiscal 2005 and 39.8% in fiscal 2004. Our effective tax rate was slightly higher in 2004 due primarily to the impact of certain non-deductible costs. See Note 9 to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements for the reconciliation of the statutory rate to our effective tax rate.

NET INCOME

Our fiscal 2005 net income decreased $2.5 million to $47.2 million as compared to $49.7 million in fiscal 2004 as a result of the factors described above.

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Our primary cash needs are working capital, capital expenditures, and debt service. Our primary source of liquidity will be cash flow from operations and borrowings under our new Revolver, and we expect that these sources will fund our ongoing requirements for working capital, debt service, and capital expenditures. These sources of liquidity may be impacted by continued demand for our products and our ability to meet debt covenants under our Senior Credit Facility, described below.

Net accounts receivable at December 30, 2006 were $110.6 million compared to $96.1 million at December 31, 2005. This increase reflects higher levels of wholesale and mass channel revenue in the latter part of fiscal 2006 as compared to the latter part of fiscal 2005.

27




Inventory levels at December 30, 2006 were $193.6 million compared to $188.5 million at December 31, 2005. This increase was driven by an increase in finished goods inventory to support forecasted demand, partially offset by the impact of lower levels of inventory in our retail stores, lower levels of excess inventory, and a decline in work in progress and raw material inventory due to the closure of our OshKosh brand sewing facility located in Uman, Mexico during the first quarter of fiscal 2006.

Net cash provided by operating activities during fiscal 2006 was $88.2 million compared to $137.3 million in fiscal 2005. Operating cash flow in fiscal 2006 is not comparable to fiscal 2005 due to the timing of the Acquisition on July 14, 2005, a point in the year when OshKosh’s working capital was at its peak. Additionally, in fiscal 2006, the Company had significant reductions in current liabilities resulting from the payment of Acquisition-related liabilities and a change in classification of the income tax benefit from the exercise of stock options resulting from the adoption of SFAS 123R as described in Note 7 to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements. Net cash provided by our operating activities in fiscal 2004 was approximately $42.7 million. The increase in net cash flow provided by operating activities in fiscal 2005 as compared to fiscal 2004 was driven by the growth in earnings, adjusted for non-cash charges related to the Transaction, increase in accounts payable and other current liabilities, and reductions in OshKosh brand inventory since the date of the Acquisition.

We invested $30.8 million in capital expenditures during fiscal 2006 compared to $22.6 million in fiscal 2005. Major investments include retail store openings and remodelings and investments in information technology. We plan to invest $35 million to $40 million in capital expenditures in fiscal 2007.

In connection with the Acquisition, we developed an integration plan including costs related to severance and relocation, facility and store closings, and contract terminations. The following liabilities, included in other current liabilities in the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements, were established at the closing of the Acquisition. Remaining payments will be funded by cash flow from operations and borrowings under our new Revolver and are expected to be paid in fiscal 2007:

(dollars in thousands)

 

Severance

 

Other
exit
costs

 

Lease
termination
costs

 

Contract
termination
costs

 

Total

 

Balance at July 14, 2005

 

 

$

9,840

 

 

$

2,075

 

 

$

7,020

 

 

 

$

2,000

 

 

$

20,935

 

Payments

 

 

(2,304

)

 

(71

)

 

(468

)

 

 

(934

)

 

(3,777

)

Adjustments to cost in excess of fair value of net assets acquired

 

 

673

 

 

(78

)

 

 

 

 

(168

)

 

427

 

Balance at December 31, 2005

 

 

8,209

 

 

1,926

 

 

6,552

 

 

 

898

 

 

17,585

 

Payments

 

 

(5,294

)

 

(1,377

)

 

(4,999

)

 

 

(399

)

 

(12,069

)

Adjustments to cost in excess of fair value of net assets acquired

 

 

(780

)

 

170

 

 

180

 

 

 

(299

)

 

(729

)

Balance at December 30, 2006

 

 

$

2,135

 

 

$

719

 

 

$

1,733

 

 

 

$

200

 

 

$

4,787

 

 

Also in connection with the Acquisition, we refinanced our former senior credit facility, which consisted of a $36.2 million Term Loan and an available $80.0 million revolving loan facility under which no borrowings were outstanding, exclusive of outstanding letters of credit, and we repurchased our Notes at a price that included a redemption premium of $14.0 million in addition to the principal amount of $113.8 million. As a result of the Refinancing, we expensed $4.5 million in debt issuance costs related to the former senior credit facility and the Notes and expensed $0.5 million related to the debt discount on the Notes.

Financing for the Transaction was provided by a new $500 million Term Loan and a $125 million revolving credit facility (including a sub-limit for letters of credit of $80 million) entered into by TWCC with Bank of America, N.A., as administrative agent, Credit Suisse, and certain other financial institutions. The proceeds from the Senior Credit Facility were used to purchase the outstanding common stock and vested stock options of OshKosh ($312.1 million), pay Transaction expenses ($6.2 million), refinance our

28




former senior credit facility ($36.2 million), repurchase our Notes ($113.8 million), pay a redemption premium on the Notes ($14.0 million), along with accrued and unpaid interest ($5.1 million), and pay debt issuance costs ($10.6 million). Approximately $1.1 million of the debt issuance costs were expensed in accordance with EITF 96-19. Other costs paid prior and subsequent to the closing of the Transaction totaled $1.4 million, including $0.2 million in debt issuance costs.

As a result of the Transaction, we experienced an increase in interest costs, with weighted-average borrowings of $397.9 million at an effective interest rate of 7.25% in fiscal 2006, as compared to weighted-average borrowings of $320.6 million at an effective interest rate of 7.66% in fiscal 2005.

In March 2006, we made a $9.0 million prepayment on our Term Loan; in May 2006 we made a $15.0 million prepayment on our Term Loan; in June 2006 we made a $10.0 million prepayment on our Term Loan; in November 2006 we made a $35.0 million prepayment on our Term Loan, and in December 2006 we made an $11.9 million prepayment on our Term Loan. In fiscal 2006, we also made scheduled amortization payments of $4.1 million.

In addition to scheduled amortization payments made during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal 2005, we prepaid an additional $67.6 million of Term Loan indebtedness in fiscal 2005.

At December 30, 2006, we had approximately $345.0 million in Term Loan borrowings and no borrowings under our Revolver, exclusive of $14.5 million of outstanding letters of credit. At December 31, 2005, we had approximately $430.0 million in Term Loan borrowings and no borrowings under our Revolver, exclusive of approximately $20.2 million of outstanding letters of credit.

The term of the Revolver expires July 14, 2011 and the term of the Term Loan expires July 14, 2012. Principal borrowings under the Term Loan are due and payable in quarterly installments of $0.9 million from March 31, 2007 through June 30, 2012 with the remaining balance of $325.8 million due on July 14, 2012.

The Senior Credit Facility requires us to hedge at least 25% of our variable rate debt under the Term Loan. On September 22, 2005, we entered into a swap agreement to receive floating interest and pay fixed interest. This swap agreement is designated as a cash flow hedge of the variable interest payments on a portion of our variable rate Term Loan debt. The swap agreement matures July 30, 2010. As of December 30, 2006, approximately $165 million of our outstanding Term Loan debt was hedged under this agreement.

On May 25, 2006, we entered into an interest rate collar agreement (the “collar”) with a floor of 4.3% and a ceiling of 5.5%. The collar covers $100 million of our variable rate Term Loan debt and is designated as a cash flow hedge of the variable interest payments on such debt. The collar matures on January 31, 2009.

On April 28, 2006, the Company entered into Amendment No. 1 (“Amendment No. 1”) to the Senior Credit Facility. Amendment No. 1 reduced the Company’s interest rate by refinancing the existing Term Loan (initially priced at LIBOR + 1.75% with a leverage-based pricing grid ranging from LIBOR + 1.50% to LIBOR + 1.75%) with a new Term Loan having an applicable rate of LIBOR + 1.50% with no leverage-based pricing grid. If the Company makes any optional prepayments of its Term Loans prior to the one-year anniversary of Amendment No. 1 in connection with any repricing transaction, the Company will be required to pay a prepayment premium of 1% of the amount of such Term Loans being prepaid. Interest is payable at the end of interest rate reset periods, which vary in length, but in no case exceed 12 months for LIBOR rate loans and quarterly for prime rate loans. The effective interest rate on variable rate Term Loan borrowings as of December 30, 2006 was 6.9%. The Senior Credit Facility contains financial covenants, including a minimum interest coverage ratio, maximum leverage ratio, and fixed charge coverage ratio. The Senior Credit Facility also sets forth mandatory and optional prepayment conditions, including an annual excess cash flow requirement, as defined, that may result in our use of cash to reduce our debt obligations. There is no excess cash flow payment required for fiscal 2006. Our

29




obligations under the Senior Credit Facility are collateralized by a first priority lien on substantially all of our assets, including the assets of our domestic subsidiaries.

On February 15, 2007, the Company’s Board of Directors approved the Company’s plan to close its White House, Tennessee distribution center, which has been utilized to distribute the Company’s OshKosh brand products. In conjunction with the plan to close this distribution center, the Company anticipates it will incur approximately $5.8 million in cash expenses. Estimated charges consist of approximately $3.8 million of severance and other employee related costs and $2.0 million of other costs to exit the facility. Additionally, the Company expects to incur approximately $3.9 million of non-cash charges relating to accelerated depreciation and asset impairment.

On February 16, 2007, the Company’s Board of Directors approved a stock repurchase program, pursuant to which the Company is authorized to purchase up to $100 million of its outstanding common shares. Such repurchases may occur from time to time in the open market, in negotiated transactions, or otherwise. This program has no time limit. The timing and amount of any repurchases will be determined by the Company’s management, based on its evaluation of market conditions, share price, and other factors.

The following table summarizes as of December 30, 2006, the maturity or expiration dates of mandatory contractual obligations and commitments for the following fiscal years:

(dollars in thousands)

 

2007

 

2008

 

2009

 

2010

 

2011

 

Thereafter

 

Total

 

Long-term debt

 

$

2,627

 

$

4,379

 

$

3,503

 

$

3,503

 

$

3,503

 

$

327,517

 

$

345,032

 

Interest on debt:
Variable rate (a)

 

23,043

 

23,043

 

23,043

 

23,043

 

23,043

 

11,522

 

126,737

 

Operating leases (see Note 10 to the Consolidated Financial Statements)

 

38,403

 

31,296

 

26,276

 

20,189

 

14,383

 

32,823

 

163,370

 

Total financial obligations

 

64,073

 

58,718

 

52,822

 

46,735

 

40,929

 

371,862

 

635,139

 

Letters of credit

 

14,546

 

 

 

 

 

 

14,546

 

Purchase obligations (b)

 

168,255

 

 

 

 

 

 

168,255

 

Total financial obligations and commitments

 

$

246,874

 

$

58,718

 

$

52,822

 

$

46,735

 

$

40,929

 

$

371,862

 

$

817,940

 


(a)           Reflects estimated variable rate interest on obligations outstanding on our Term Loan as of December 30, 2006 using an interest rate of 6.9% (rate in effect at December 30, 2006).

(b)          Unconditional purchase obligations are defined as agreements to purchase goods or services that are enforceable and legally binding on us and that specify all significant terms, including fixed or minimum quantities to be purchased; fixed, minimum, or variable price provisions; and the approximate timing of the transaction. The purchase obligations category above relates to commitments for inventory purchases. Amounts reflected on the accompanying audited consolidated balance sheet in accounts payable or other current liabilities are excluded from the table above.

In addition to the total contractual obligations and commitments in the table above, we have post-retirement benefit obligations, included in other current and other long-term liabilities as further described in Note 8 to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements.

Based on our current level of operations, we believe that cash generated from operations and available cash, together with amounts available under our Revolver, will be adequate to meet our debt service requirements, capital expenditures, and working capital needs for the foreseeable future, although no assurance can be given in this regard. We may, however, need to refinance all or a portion of the principal amount of amounts outstanding under our Revolver on or before July 14, 2011 and amounts outstanding under our Term Loan on or before July 14, 2012.

30




EFFECTS OF INFLATION AND DEFLATION

We are affected by inflation and changing prices primarily through purchasing product from our global suppliers, increased operating costs and expenses, and fluctuations in interest rates. The effects of inflation on our net sales and operations have not been material in recent years. In recent years, there has been deflationary pressure on selling prices. While we have been successful in offsetting such deflationary pressures through product improvements and lower costs with the expansion of our global sourcing network, if deflationary price trends outpace our ability to obtain further price reductions from our global suppliers, our profitability may be affected.

SEASONALITY

We experience seasonal fluctuations in our sales and profitability, with generally lower sales and gross profit in the first and second quarters of our fiscal year. Over the past five fiscal years, excluding the impact of the Acquisition in fiscal 2005, approximately 57% of our consolidated net sales were generated in the second half of our fiscal year. Accordingly, our results of operations for the first and second quarters of any year are not indicative of the results we expect for the full year.

As a result of this seasonality, our inventory levels and other working capital requirements generally begin to increase during the second quarter and into the third quarter of each fiscal year. We had $5.0 million in peak borrowings in fiscal 2006 and no borrowings under our former revolving credit facility or new Revolver during fiscal 2005.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

Our significant accounting policies are described in Note 2 to the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements. The following discussion addresses our critical accounting policies and estimates, which are those policies that require management’s most difficult and subjective judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain.

Revenue recognition: We recognize wholesale and mass channel revenue after shipment of products to customers, when title passes, when all risks and rewards of ownership have transferred, the sales price is fixed or determinable, and collectibility is reasonably assured. In certain cases, in which we retain the risk of loss during shipment, revenue recognition does not occur until the goods have reached the specified customer. In the normal course of business, we grant certain accommodations and allowances to our wholesale and mass channel customers. We provide accommodations and allowances to our key wholesale and mass channel customers in order to assist these customers with inventory clearance and promotions. Such amounts are reflected as a reduction of net sales and are recorded based upon historical trends and annual forecasts. Retail store revenues are recognized at the point of sale. We reduce revenue for customer returns and deductions. We also maintain an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the inability of our customers to make payments and other actual and estimated deductions. If the financial condition of our customers were to deteriorate, resulting in an impairment of their ability to make payments, an additional

31




allowance could be required. Past due balances over 90 days are reviewed individually for collectibility. Our credit and collections department reviews all other balances regularly. Account balances are charged off against the allowance when we feel it is probable the receivable will not be recovered.

We contract with a third-party service to provide us with the fair value of cooperative advertising arrangements entered into with certain of our major wholesale and mass channel customers. Such fair value is determined based upon, among other factors, comparable market analysis for similar advertisements. In accordance with EITF Issue No. 01-09, “Accounting for Consideration Given by a Vendor to a Customer/Reseller,” we have included the fair value of these arrangements of approximately $3.3 million in fiscal 2006, $4.8 million in fiscal 2005, and $3.3 million in fiscal 2004 as a component of selling, general, and administrative expenses on the accompanying audited consolidated statement of operations rather than as a reduction of revenue. Amounts determined to be in excess of the fair value of these arrangements are recorded as a reduction of net sales.

Inventory: We provide reserves for slow-moving inventory equal to the difference between the cost of inventory and the estimated market value based upon assumptions about future demand and market conditions. If actual market conditions are less favorable than those we project, additional write-downs may be required.

Cost in excess of fair value of net assets acquired and tradename: As of December 30, 2006, we had approximately $602.0 million in cost in excess of fair value of net assets acquired and tradename assets. The fair value of the Carter’s tradename was estimated at the 2001 Acquisition to be approximately $220 million using a discounted cash flow analysis, which examined the hypothetical cost savings that accrue as a result of our ownership of the tradename. The fair value of the OshKosh tradename was estimated at the Acquisition to be approximately $102 million, also using a discounted cash flow analysis. The cash flows, which incorporated both historical and projected financial performance, were discounted using a discount rate of 10% and 12% for Carter’s and OshKosh, respectively. The tradenames were determined to have indefinite lives. The carrying value of these assets is subject to annual impairment reviews as of the last day of each fiscal year. Factors affecting such impairment reviews include the continued market acceptance of our offered products and the development of new products. Impairment reviews may also be triggered by any significant events or changes in circumstances. Our impairment review of cost in excess of fair value of net assets acquired is based on the estimated fair values of the underlying businesses. These estimated fair values are based on estimates of the future cash flows of the businesses.

Accrued expenses: Accrued expenses for health insurance, workers’ compensation, incentive compensation, and other outstanding obligations are assessed based on actual commitments, statistical trends, and estimates based on projections and current expectations, and these estimates are updated periodically as additional information becomes available.

Accounting for income taxes: As part of the process of preparing the accompanying audited consolidated financial statements, we are required to estimate our actual current tax exposure (state, federal, and foreign), together with assessing permanent and temporary differences resulting from differing bases and treatment of items for tax and accounting purposes, such as the carrying value of intangibles, deductibility of expenses, depreciation of property, plant, and equipment, and valuation of inventories. Temporary differences result in deferred tax assets and liabilities, which are included within our consolidated balance sheets. We must then assess the likelihood that our deferred tax assets will be recovered from future taxable income. Actual results could differ from this assessment if sufficient taxable income is not generated in future periods. To the extent we determine the need to establish a valuation allowance or increase such allowance in a period, we must include an expense within the tax provision in the accompanying audited consolidated statement of operations.

32




Stock-based compensation arrangements: The Company accounts for stock-based compensation in accordance with the fair value recognition provisions of SFAS 123R. The Company adopted SFAS 123R using the modified prospective application method of transition. The Company uses the Black-Scholes option pricing model, which requires the use of subjective assumptions. These assumptions include the following:

Volatility—This is a measure of the amount by which a stock price has fluctuated or is expected to fluctuate. The Company uses actual monthly historical changes in the market value of our stock since the Company’s initial public offering on October 29, 2003, supplemented by peer company data for periods prior to our initial public offering covering the expected life of options being valued. An increase in the expected volatility will increase compensation expense.

Risk-free interest rate—This is the U.S. Treasury rate as of the grant date having a term equal to the expected term of the option. An increase in the risk-free interest rate will increase compensation expense.

Expected term—This is the period of time over which the options granted are expected to remain outstanding and is based on historical experience and estimated future exercise behavior. Separate groups of employees that have similar historical exercise behavior are considered separately for valuation purposes. An increase in the expected term will increase compensation expense.

Dividend yield—The Company does not have plans to pay dividends in the foreseeable future. An increase in the dividend yield will decrease compensation expense.

Forfeitures—The Company estimates forfeitures of stock-based awards based on historical experience and expected future activity.

Changes in the subjective assumptions can materially affect the estimate of fair value of stock-based compensation and consequently, the related amount recognized in the accompanying audited consolidated statement of operations.

RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

In June 2006, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued FASB Interpretation No. 48, “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes—an interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109” (“FIN 48”). FIN 48 prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return, and also provides guidance on derecognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure, and transition. The evaluation of a tax position in accordance with this interpretation begins with a determination as to whether it is “more likely than not” that a tax position will be sustained upon examination based on the technical merits of the position. A tax position that meets the “more likely than not” recognition threshold is then measured at the largest amount of benefit that is greater than 50 percent likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement for recognition in the financial statements. FIN 48 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2006. The cumulative effect, if any, of applying FIN 48 will be recorded as an adjustment to retained earnings as of the beginning of the period of adoption. While our analysis of the impact of this interpretation is not yet complete, we do not anticipate it will have a material impact on our retained earnings at the time of adoption.

In September 2006, the FASB issued SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements” (“SFAS 157”), which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value, and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. The provisions of SFAS 157 are effective as of the beginning of our 2008 fiscal year. We are currently evaluating the impact of adopting SFAS 157 on our financial statements.

33




In February 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities—Including an Amendment of FASB Statement No. 115” (“SFAS 159”), which provides entities with an option to report selected financial assets and liabilities at fair value. SFAS 159 also establishes presentation and disclosure requirements designed to facilitate comparisons between entities that choose different measurement attributes for similar types of assets and liabilities. This statement is effective as of the beginning of the first fiscal year that begins after November 15, 2007. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that SFAS 159 will have on its consolidated financial statements.

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Statements contained herein that relate to our future performance, including, without limitation, statements with respect to our anticipated results of operations or level of business for fiscal 2007 or any other future period, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements are based on current expectations only and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties, and assumptions. Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary materially from those anticipated, estimated, or projected. These risks are described under the heading “Risk Factors” on page 8.

ITEM 7A.        QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

In the operation of our business, we have market risk exposures, including those related to foreign currency risk and interest rates. These risks and our strategies to manage our exposure to them are discussed below.

We contract for production with third parties primarily in the Far East and South and Central America. While these contracts are stated in United States dollars, there can be no assurance that the cost for the future production of our products will not be affected by exchange rate fluctuations between the United States dollar and the local currencies of these contractors. Due to the number of currencies involved, we cannot quantify the potential impact of future currency fluctuations on net income in future years. In order to manage this risk, we source products from approximately 100 vendors worldwide, providing us with flexibility in our production should significant fluctuations occur between the United States dollar and various local currencies. To date, such exchange fluctuations have not had a material impact on our financial condition or results of operations. We do not hedge foreign currency exchange rate risk.

Our operating results are subject to risk from interest rate fluctuations on our Senior Credit Facility, which carries variable interest rates. As of December 30, 2006, our outstanding debt aggregated approximately $345.0 million, of which $79.9 million bore interest at a variable rate. An increase of 1% in the applicable rate would increase our annual interest cost by $0.8 million, exclusive of variable rate debt subject to our swap and collar agreements described above, and could have an adverse effect on our net income and cash flow.

OTHER RISKS

There also are other risks in the operation of our business specifically related to our global sourcing network.

We source all of our production from third-party manufacturers primarily located in foreign countries. As a result, we may be adversely affected by political instability resulting in the disruption of trade from foreign countries, the imposition of new regulations relating to imports, duties, taxes, and other charges on imports, including the China safeguards, any significant decreases in the value of the U.S. dollar against foreign currencies, and restrictions on the transfer of funds. These and other factors could result in the

34




interruption of production in offshore facilities, delay receipt of the products into the United States, or affect our operating income. Our future performance may be subject to such factors, which are beyond our control, and there can be no assurance that such factors would not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. We carefully select our sourcing agents and, in an effort to mitigate the possible disruption in product flow, we place production in various countries that we believe to be of lower risk.

We enter into various purchase order commitments with full-package suppliers. We can cancel these arrangements, although in some instances, we may be subject to a termination charge reflecting a percentage of work performed prior to cancellation. Historically, such cancellations and related termination charges have not had a material impact on our business. However, as we rely nearly exclusively on our full-package global sourcing network, we expect to incur more of these termination charges, which could increase our cost of goods sold.

35




ITEM 8.                FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

CARTER’S, INC.
INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Page

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

37

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets at December 30, 2006 and December 31, 2005

 

39

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the fiscal years ended December 30, 2006, December 31, 2005, and January 1, 2005

 

40

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the fiscal years ended December 30, 2006, December 31, 2005, and January 1, 2005

 

41

 

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity for the fiscal years ended December 30, 2006, December 31, 2005, and January 1, 2005

 

42

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

43

 

 

36




REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of Carter’s, Inc.:

We have completed integrated audits of Carter’s, Inc. and its subsidiaries (the “Company”) consolidated financial statements and of its internal control over financial reporting as of December 30, 2006, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Our opinions, based on our audits, are presented below.

Consolidated financial statements

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements listed in the accompanying index present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Carter’s, Inc. and its subsidiaries at December 30, 2006 and December 31, 2005, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three fiscal years in the period ended December 30, 2006 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits. We conducted our audits of these statements in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit of financial statements includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

As discussed in Note 7 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company changed the manner in which it accounts for stock-based compensation in 2006.

Internal control over financial reporting

Also, in our opinion, management’s assessment, included in Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting appearing under ITEM 9A, that the Company maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 30, 2006 based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO), is fairly stated, in all material respects, based on those criteria.

Furthermore, in our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 30, 2006, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the COSO. The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. Our responsibility is to express opinions on management’s assessment and on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit. We conducted our audit of internal control over financial reporting in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. An audit of internal control over financial reporting includes obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, evaluating management’s assessment, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control, and performing such other procedures as we consider necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinions.

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for

37




external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

/s/ PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Stamford, Connecticut
February 28, 2007

38




CARTER’S, INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(dollars in thousands, except for share data)

 

 

December 30,
2006

 

December 31,
2005

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

 

$

68,545

 

 

 

$

84,276

 

 

Accounts receivable, net of reserve for doubtful accounts of $3,316 in fiscal 2006 and $3,947 in fiscal 2005

 

 

110,615

 

 

 

96,144

 

 

Inventories, net

 

 

193,588

 

 

 

188,454

 

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

7,296

 

 

 

6,262

 

 

Deferred income taxes

 

 

22,377

 

 

 

23,909

 

 

Total current assets

 

 

402,421

 

 

 

399,045

 

 

Property, plant, and equipment, net

 

 

87,940

 

 

 

79,458

 

 

Tradenames

 

 

322,233

 

 

 

322,233

 

 

Cost in excess of fair value of net assets acquired

 

 

279,756

 

 

 

284,172

 

 

Licensing agreements, net of accumulated amortization of $6,205 in fiscal 2006 and $1,950 in fiscal 2005

 

 

12,895

 

 

 

17,150

 

 

Deferred debt issuance costs, net

 

 

5,903

 

 

 

8,257

 

 

Leasehold interests, net of accumulated amortization of $682 in fiscal 2006 and $214 in fiscal 2005

 

 

1,151

 

 

 

1,619

 

 

Other assets

 

 

10,892

 

 

 

4,793

 

 

Total assets

 

 

$

1,123,191

 

 

 

$

1,116,727

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current maturities of long-term debt

 

 

$

2,627

 

 

 

$

3,241

 

 

Accounts payable

 

 

70,878

 

 

 

63,735

 

 

Other current liabilities

 

 

63,012

 

 

 

89,627

 

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

136,517

 

 

 

156,603

 

 

Long-term debt

 

 

342,405

 

 

 

426,791

 

 

Deferred income taxes

 

 

125,784

 

 

 

124,439

 

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

22,994

 

 

 

22,250

 

 

Total liabilities

 

 

627,700

 

 

 

730,083

 

 

Commitments and contingencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock; par value $.01 per share; 100,000 shares authorized; none issued or outstanding at December 30, 2006 and December 31, 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, voting; par value $.01 per share; 150,000,000 shares authorized; 58,927,280 shares issued and outstanding at December 30, 2006; 40,000,000 shares authorized; 28,909,729 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2005

 

 

589

 

 

 

289

 

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

275,045

 

 

 

260,414

 

 

Deferred compensation

 

 

 

 

 

(2,749

)

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income

 

 

5,301

 

 

 

1,354

 

 

Retained earnings

 

 

214,556

 

 

 

127,336

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

495,491

 

 

 

386,644

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

 

$

1,123,191

 

 

 

$

1,116,727

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements

39




CARTER’S, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(dollars in thousands, except per share data)

 

 

For the fiscal years ended

 

 

 

December 30,
2006

 

December 31,
2005

 

January 1,
2005

 

Net sales

 

$

1,343,467

 

$

1,121,358

 

$

823,121

 

Cost of goods sold

 

854,970

 

725,086

 

525,082

 

Gross profit

 

488,497

 

396,272

 

298,039

 

Selling, general, and administrative expenses

 

352,459

 

288,624

 

208,756

 

Closure costs

 

91

 

6,828

 

620

 

Royalty income

 

(29,164

)

(20,426

)

(12,362

)

Operating income

 

165,111

 

121,246

 

101,025

 

Interest income

 

(1,914

)

(1,322

)

(335

)

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

20,137

 

 

Interest expense

 

28,837

 

24,564

 

18,852

 

Income before income taxes

 

138,188

 

77,867

 

82,508

 

Provision for income taxes

 

50,968

 

30,665

 

32,850

 

Net income

 

$

87,220

 

$

47,202

 

$

49,658

 

Basic net income per common share

 

$

1.50

 

$

0.82

 

$

0.88

 

Diluted net income per common share

 

$

1.42

 

$

0.78

 

$

0.83

 

Basic weighted-average number of shares outstanding

 

57,996,241

 

57,280,504

 

56,251,168

 

Diluted weighted-average number of shares outstanding

 

61,247,122

 

60,753,384

 

59,855,914

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements

40




CARTER’S, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(dollars in thousands)

 

 

For the fiscal years ended

 

 

 

December 30,
2006

 

December 31,
2005

 

January 1,
2005

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

 

$

87,220

 

 

 

$

47,202

 

 

 

$

49,658

 

 

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

26,489

 

 

 

21,912

 

 

 

19,536

 

 

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

 

 

 

20,137

 

 

 

 

 

Amortization of debt issuance costs

 

 

2,354

 

 

 

2,802

 

 

 

1,799

 

 

Amortization of inventory step-up

 

 

 

 

 

13,900

 

 

 

 

 

Accretion of debt discount

 

 

 

 

 

40

 

 

 

75

 

 

Non-cash stock-based compensation expense

 

 

5,942

 

 

 

1,824

 

 

 

377

 

 

Non-cash closure costs

 

 

 

 

 

113

 

 

 

 

 

Loss (gain) on sale of property, plant, and equipment

 

 

118

 

 

 

(64

)

 

 

164

 

 

Income tax benefit from exercised stock options

 

 

(9,155

)

 

 

6,590

 

 

 

3,807

 

 

Deferred income taxes

 

 

502

 

 

 

380

 

 

 

(3,143

)

 

Effect of changes in operating assets and liabilities (net of assets acquired and liabilities assumed):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable

 

 

(14,471

)

 

 

275

 

 

 

(15,122

)

 

Inventories

 

 

(5,134

)

 

 

4,639

 

 

 

(16,032

)

 

Prepaid expenses and other assets

 

 

(886

)

 

 

543

 

 

 

2,132

 

 

Accounts payable

 

 

7,143

 

 

 

18,230

 

 

 

(3,983

)

 

Other liabilities

 

 

(11,898

)

 

 

(1,256

)

 

 

3,408

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

 

88,224

 

 

 

137,267

 

 

 

42,676

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acquisition of OshKosh B’Gosh, Inc., net of cash acquired

 

 

 

 

 

(309,984

)

 

 

 

 

Capital expenditures

 

 

(30,848

)

 

 

(22,588

)

 

 

(20,481

)

 

Proceeds from sale of property, plant, and equipment

 

 

348

 

 

 

2,860

 

 

 

1,304

 

 

Sale of investments

 

 

 

 

 

229,180

 

 

 

 

 

Purchase of investments

 

 

 

 

 

(210,825

)

 

 

 

 

Collections on loan

 

 

 

 

 

2,954

 

 

 

600

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(30,500

)

 

 

(308,403

)

 

 

(18,577

)

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payments on new term loan

 

 

(85,000

)

 

 

(69,968

)

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from new term loan

 

 

 

 

 

500,000

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from revolving loan facility

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payments on revolving loan facility

 

 

(5,000

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from former revolving loan facility

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

90,510

 

 

Payments on former revolving loan facility

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(90,510

)

 

Payments on former term loan

 

 

 

 

 

(71,326

)

 

 

(28,286

)

 

Payment of 10.875% Senior Subordinated Notes

 

 

 

 

 

(113,750

)

 

 

 

 

Payment of debt redemption premium

 

 

 

 

 

(14,015

)

 

 

 

 

Payments of capital lease obligations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(164

)

 

Payments of debt issuance costs

 

 

 

 

 

(10,780

)

 

 

 

 

Income tax benefit from exercised stock options

 

 

9,155

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from exercise of stock options

 

 

2,390

 

 

 

1,986

 

 

 

1,555

 

 

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

 

 

(73,455

)

 

 

222,147

 

 

 

(26,895

)

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

(15,731

)

 

 

51,011

 

 

 

(2,796

)

 

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

 

 

84,276

 

 

 

33,265

 

 

 

36,061

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

 

 

$

68,545

 

 

 

$

84,276

 

 

 

$

33,265

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements

41




CARTER’S, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(dollars in thousands, except for share data)

 

 

Common
stock

 

Additional
paid-in
capital

 

Deferred
compensation

 

Accumulated
other
comprehensive
income

 

Retained
earnings

 

Total
stockholders’
equity

 

Balance at January 3, 2004

 

 

$

280

 

 

 

$

241,780

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

$

30,476

 

 

 

$

272,536

 

 

Tax benefit from exercise of stock options

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,807

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,807

 

 

Exercise of stock options (888,114 shares)

 

 

4

 

 

 

1,551

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,555

 

 

Compensation expense on stock
options

 

 

 

 

 

 

372

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

372

 

 

Issuance of restricted stock (6,070 shares)

 

 

 

 

 

 

100

 

 

 

(100

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amortization of deferred
compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

Net income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

49,658

 

 

 

49,658

 

 

Balance at January 1, 2005

 

 

284

 

 

 

247,610

 

 

 

(95

)